The New Statesman’s rolling politics blog

RSS

Five of the Best

The top five comment pieces from today's papers

The Guardian's Seumas Milne warns that the Tories will win a landslide victory unless Labour transforms the argument over public debt into one over market failure:

Cheered on by the bulk of the media, Cameron and Osborne have executed a startling sleight of hand, persuading a large section of the public that the real crisis facing the country isn't the havoc wreaked on jobs and living standards by the breakdown of the free-market model -- but the increase in government debt incurred to pay for it.

In the Independent, Adrian Hamilton argues that the Lisbon Treaty will entrench the worst features of the European Union:

[I]f it is a concerted drive towards the future that you want in Europe, then it would be best if the Irish did reject the treaty a second time. That, at least, would force the heads of Europe to get their act together in response. Without it, we're back to the bad old ways of doing things -- the backroom deals over appointments, the watered-down policies and the aimless bureaucracy. After Barrosa we'll get the manoeuvring over the European presidency and the new foreign minister and we'll end up in just the same way, with the lowest common denominator candidate.

Over at Salon, Andy Kroll says that the lobbying industry has continued to flourish under Obama:

If the president's sprawling agenda has revealed anything, it's the extent to which private industries and their foot soldiers on K Street and Capitol Hill influence -- and in some cases dictate -- American policymaking. Right now, about 12,500 federally registered lobbyists make their trade in Washington, but believe it or not, they're only a small slice of the pie.

In the Times, Nick Clegg argues that just as Labour superseded the Liberal Party, so the Liberal Democrats will replace Labour as the dominant progressive party:

Labour deserved to win against the Liberals then. I believe Liberals deserve to win against Labour now. Because Labour's basic reflexes -- central state activism, hoarding power at the centre, top-down government -- are the wrong tools to meet the challenges of the modern world. We live in a society where people are no longer rigidly defined by class or place, no longer trapped by a culture of hierarchy.

In the Daily Telegraph, Jon Kay says that separating commercial banking from investment banking is a more urgent priority than greater regulation:

The better solution is structural -- to split the utility banking, the boring bit of the system that meets our daily needs in terms of paying bills and receiving salaries, from the casino. After all, when you think it through, utility banking is not boring at all. Technology is creating a revolution in financial services: it is easy to envisage a world in which all payments can be made with the wave of a card or the click of a mouse, and cash is only used for illegal transactions.