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Five of the Best

The top five comment pieces from today's papers and the web

Salon's Mike Madden explodes five right-wing myths about 'socialised medicine'.

Turning America socialist apparently wasn't enough for him -- now President Obama is trying to make old people kill themselves, callously deny important medical procedures, funnel tax dollars to abortion clinics and wiggle the government's way into every doctor's office in America.

Robert Skidelsky writes in the Financial Times on how to rebuild the reputation of economics.

Keynes opened the way to political economy; but economists opted for a regressive research programme, disguised by sophisticated mathematics, that set it apart. The present crisis gives us an opportunity to try again.

The Times's reporter at large Martin Fletcher argues that Britain should have boycotted President Ahmadinejad's inauguration.

Mr Ahmadinejad and the Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, are many things, most of them not very nice -- but they are not fools. They may or may not negotiate on nuclear issues, but their decision will certainly not depend on whether a clutch of ambassadors graced the President's inauguration.

The Guardian's Seumas Milne predicts that mass unemployment will offer Labour one more chance for radical intervention.

David Cameron's plans to focus the economic policy of an incoming Tory government on reducing public debt by slashing public spending can only deepen recession or hold back recovery. A moment for a fundamental change of direction may have been missed last autumn. But given the expected consequences, the chance is likely to come again.

Anne Penketh writes in the Independent that Bill Clinton's visit to North Korea has revealed Obama's nuclear disarmament strategy.

Obama has reached out to his former antagonist in order to play to Mr Clinton's strengths. And he may have taken another step along the road to nuclear disarmament. Believe me, the Iranians are watching.