Obama should rue the day he appointed Clinton

The revival of the Clinton psychodrama is blocking Obama's attempt to transcend the old divisions

Hillary Clinton's humourless response to a Congolese student who asked what her husband thought of China's economic relations with the Congo should remind President Obama of the hazards of having the Clinton family drama back at the centre of US politics.

The student, who in fact asked for Obama's thoughts on the subject and had his question mangled by a hapless translator, was dealt a stinging reply by Clinton.

"You want me to tell you what my husband thinks?" she asked incredulously. "My husband is not the secretary of state, I am. You ask my opinion, I will tell you my opinion; I'm not going to channel my husband."

The incident confirms that self-deprecation remains an art foreign to Clinton and that her status as secretary of state has done little to assuage her resentment at not landing the top job.

In today's Independent, Helen Wilkinson (while failing to note the erroneous translation) apparently defends Clinton on the basis that she is a female politician and that some of her critics are misogynists. She refers her readers to the almost "pathological" attacks on Clinton during the presidential campaign.

Well, in fact there was something rather vulgar and sinister about the sexist attacks on Clinton.

The Fox News correspondent Tucker Carlson, for instance, crudely remarked that Clinton: "feels castrating, overbearing and scary . . . When she comes on television, I involuntarily cross my legs." While right-wing goons, whose idea of a fun day out is to chant "iron my shirt" at female politicians, were painfully conspicuous throughout the campaign.

But what will not do is to rewrite history, as Wilkinson does, and portray Clinton as a political innocent who has always steered clear of smear tactics.

It was Clinton who during the scurrilous campaign to 'out' Obama as a 'secret Muslim' pandered to such paranoia by declaring that Obama was not a Muslim "as far as I know ". And it was the Clinton camp that appealed to the US electorate's basest instincts by circulating images of Obama dressed in traditional Somali garb across the media.

Moreover, Clinton's mendacious claim to have come "under sniper fire" at the Tuzla Air Force Base during her trip to Bosnia (a subsequent video revealed her peaceful arrival) should have disqualified her from holding any political office.

Obama's decision to welcome Clinton into his administration after her disgraceful campaign may have appeared magnanimous to some but to me it seemed almost masochistic.

As Maureen Dowd has cogently argued in the New York Times, the presence of Clinton in Obama's team has stymied his attempt to transcend the old political divisions.

"The postpartisan, postracial, post-Clinton-dysfunction world that Barack Obama was supposed to usher in when he hit town on his white charger, with turtle doves tweeting, has vanished."

At a time when the Obama administration desparately needs to mount a rearguard action against the conservative assaults on its health-care policy it can ill afford the revival of the Clinton psychodrama.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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How Jeremy Corbyn and an Arsenal player roasted Piers Morgan… in Spanish

Muy burn.

As if politics in the UK wasn’t spicy enough, watch what happens when you do it in Spanish.

It all started when backward ham Piers Morgan complained in a piece for the Mail that Jeremy Corbyn and his wife froze him out of a conversation with the Arsenal player Héctor Bellerín at the GQ Awards:

“Later, fellow Arsenal fan Jeremy Corbyn came over to speak to him. When I tried to interrupt, the Labour leader – whose wife is Mexican – promptly switched to fluent Spanish to shut me out of the conversation.

‘What did you tell him?’ I asked.

Corbyn smirked. ‘I told him to please send Arsène Wenger my very best and assure him he continues to have my full support, even if he’s lost yours, Piers. In fact, particularly because he’s lost yours…’

A keen-eyed tweeter picked up the passage about speaking Spanish, and the anecdote went viral:


So viral, in fact, that Bellerín himself commented on the story in a tweet saying, “Come on mate, don’t take it personally” to Morgan – punctuated masterfully with a crying laughing emoji.


Then the Labour leader himself joined in the great burning ceremony, replying to the thread in full Spanish:


His response translates as:

“It was nice to meet you. It’s better that we don’t tell him what we were talking about, he wouldn’t understand. Well-played in the game on Sunday.”

And muy buen juego to you too, El Jez.

I'm a mole, innit.