Five of the Best

The top five comment pieces from today's papers

In the Times, the historian Felipe Fernández-Armesto argues against the Malthusian terror that emerges as the UK population grows:

Population increase causes none of the problems commonly ascribed to it. We face crises of biodiversity and resources -- but because of our madcap consumption, not our numbers.

The Conservative MEP Daniel Hannan writes in the Daily Telegraph on the growing intolerance of dissenting MPs:

My point is that we seem to have lost the notion that a backbencher speaks for himself. I like David Cameron, and want him to be prime minister, not least so that Britain stops racking up debt. But the idea that I therefore agree with him on every issue is, when you think about it, silly.

The Economist's Bagehot column discusses the lack of talent on the Labour and Conservative front benches and suggests that a US-style system of outside appointments could remedy this:

The solution is simple. Prime ministers should reach beyond Westminster for more of their hires. The more technocratic departments could be led by captains of industry or accomplished scientists. Some might even survive handovers of power, like Robert Gates, the defence secretary retained by Barack Obama.

The Independent's Johann Hari criticises the new film version of Naomi Klein's The Shock Doctrine, which Klein has publicly distanced herself from.

In the Wall Street Journal, Bjørn Lomborg explores the technological solutions to climate change:

One proposal would have boats spray seawater droplets into clouds above the sea to make them reflect more sunlight back into space -- augmenting the natural process where evaporating ocean sea salt helps to provide tiny particles for clouds to form around.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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The NS Podcast #176: Younge, guns and identity politics

The New Statesman podcast.

Helen and Stephen are joined by author and editor-at-large for the Guardian, Gary Younge, to discuss the findings of his new book: Another Day in the Death of America.

Seven kids die every day from gun violence in the US yet very few make the national news. Is there any way to stop Americans becoming inured to the bloodshed? The enraging, incredibly sad and sometimes peculiarly funny stories of ten kids on one unremarkable Saturday attempt to change that trend.

(Helen Lewis, Stephen Bush, Gary Younge).

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