US jobs figures far below estimates

Manufacturing growth also slows

The US jobs figures are in, and they aren't particularly great. 69,000 new jobs were created, whereas the consensus estimate had been 150,000. Further downward revisions for the last two months, as well:

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for March was revised from +154,000 to +143,000, and the change for April was revised from +115,000 to +77,000.

In fact, the revisions downwards are almost more damaging. The first estimate for May being bad is the headline news, but may be inaccurate; the fact that the March estimates are still being revised downwards in the third estimate hints at real damage to the underlying structure of the economy which has yet to be resolved.

The news pushed the US bond market, already at a ridiculously weak level, lower still, finishing at 1.46:

One silver lining for the US is that manufacturing data, in contrast to the UK, is holding up. The PMI, released today, stands at 54. Although down from 56 last month, any number above 50 indicates that the sector is expanding.

Chris Williamson, Markit's chief economist, said:

The data compares well with PMI surveys for other countries, and suggests that the U.S. economy is showing encouraging resilience in the face of the many headwinds from abroad. The slower growth in May was largely due to a near-stagnation of export orders, reflecting deteriorating demand in many overseas markets, notably the Eurozone but also emerging markets such as China.

A job seeker fills out an application during a job fair hosted by the State of New York. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Michael Gove definitely didn't betray anyone, says Michael Gove

What's a disagreement among friends?

Michael Gove is certainly not a traitor and he thinks Theresa May is absolutely the best leader of the Conservative party.

That's according to the cast out Brexiteer, who told the BBC's World At One life on the back benches has given him the opportunity to reflect on his mistakes. 

He described Boris Johnson, his one-time Leave ally before he decided to run against him for leader, as "phenomenally talented". 

Asked whether he had betrayed Johnson with his surprise leadership bid, Gove protested: "I wouldn't say I stabbed him in the back."

Instead, "while I intially thought Boris was the right person to be Prime Minister", he later came to the conclusion "he wasn't the right person to be Prime Minister at that point".

As for campaigning against the then-PM David Cameron, he declared: "I absolutely reject the idea of betrayal." Instead, it was a "disagreement" among friends: "Disagreement among friends is always painful."

Gove, who up to July had been a government minister since 2010, also found time to praise the person in charge of hiring government ministers, Theresa May. 

He said: "With the benefit of hindsight and the opportunity to spend some time on the backbenches reflecting on some of the mistakes I've made and some of the judgements I've made, I actually think that Theresa is the right leader at the right time. 

"I think that someone who took the position she did during the referendum is very well placed both to unite the party and lead these negotiations effectively."

Gove, who told The Times he was shocked when Cameron resigned after the Brexit vote, had backed Johnson for leader.

However, at the last minute he announced his candidacy, and caused an infuriated Johnson to pull his own campaign. Gove received just 14 per cent of the vote in the final contest, compared to 60.5 per cent for May. 


Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.