Opinionomics | 6 June 2012

Must-read comment and analysis. Back to the Eurozone!

1. Panic has become all too rational (Financial Times)

If those with good credit refuse to support those under pressure, when the latter cannot save themselves, the system will surely perish, writes Martin Wolf.

2. Simmering anger in Seville (BBC News)

Paul Mason reports from Seville on the human cost of the Spanish crisis

3. Markets against markets (Stumbling and Mumbling)

Was the crisis a function of too few markets? Probably not.

4. Michael Geismar’s blackjack strategy (Reuters)

When mathematician and blackjack expert Jonathan Adler saw Felix Salmon's post about hedge fund manager Michael Geismar’s antics at the Vegas blackjack tables, he offered to explain just how silly Geismar was being.

5. Prepare for “no austerity without growth” (Left Foot Forward)

Cormac Hollingsworth lays out the Tsipras agenda for the eurocrisis

Mario Draghi of the ECB. Why won't they help? Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Matt Cardy/Getty Images
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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.