Opinionomics | 9 May 2012

Must-read comment and analysis. Featuring exhortations to buy a house but not to buy a Death Star.

1. How the Chancellor made the right decision about the timing of austerity (Not the Treasury View)

Jonathan Portes looks back in time to understand the relationship between austerity and growth.

2. Greece, France and the future of the euro (BBC News)

The more that investors and policymakers think about the results in Greece and France, the more worried they are - for good reason, writes Stephanie Flanders.

3. Chart of the day: Let’s go buy a house! (Reuters)

Felix Salmon shows how Americans can now take advantage of long-term fixed financing to own a home for a monthly payment less than the cost of renting.

4. ‘Understood properly, the Death Star is not worth it.’ (Washington Post | Wonkblog)

Gregory Koger addresses the most important policy question of the millennium: Should we build a Death Star?

5. Germany’s reaction to the newly elected French President (Bruegel)

Philine Schuseil rounds up the German reaction to the election of Hollande.

The Death Star. We shouldn't build one, apparently.

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.