Opinionomics | 3 May 2012

Must-read comment and analysis. The Eurozone's all messed up - but can it change course?

1. Lex in depth: Facebook (£) (Financial Times)

Robert Armstrong and Stuart Kirk crunch the numbers about the upcoming Facebook IPO.

2. What are the alternatives to austerity for the Eurozone? (Marginal Revolution)

Tyler Cowen hits back at Ryan Avent's response to Gideon Rachman (it's all getting a bit warlike in the commentariat), and takes a similar line to Rachman himself – regardless of the benefits (or not) of austerity, there's no realisitic alternative.

3. The boom and bust of Mervyn King (BBC News)

Robert Peston shares his thoughts on Mervyn King's Today Programme lecture.

4. Call it a depression (Economist | Free Exchange)

Ryan Avent argues that even absent a major economic crisis, the situation in the Eurozone is as bad as it can be.

5. What is living and what is dead in the contributory principle? (ToUChstone)

Kate Bell and Declan Gaffney assess the contributory principle 70 years on from Beveridge.

The French presidential debate, the results of which will dictate where the Eurozone crisis goes from here. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Matt Cardy/Getty Images
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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.