Opinionomics | 29 May 2012

Must-read comment and analysis. Featuring the return of pasties.

1. What views can you hold about Spain? (Marginal Revolution)

Tyler Cowen lists all the possible positions one can take on the Spanish situation.

2. The IMF on UK macroeconomic policy: Part 2 (Financial Times)

Martin Wolf asks: Is it the case that greater flexibility on fiscal policy, to support demand, might destroy the UK government’s credibility, with disastrous results? Martin Wolf answers: No.

3. What a joke as pasty-faced Chancellor is forced to eat humble pie and bin plans for a pasty tax (Telegraph)

Ian Cowie on pies, pasties and populism.

4. From NHS to the national Serco service (Guardian)

Jacqueline Davis is concerned about the more pernicious effects of privatisation in the NHS.

5. Shareholder spring? It was just a cynical attempt to keep Vince Cable at bay (Independent)

Companies should put some of the money they give to their executives back where it belongs... in the pockets of shareholders, writes James Moore.

Greggs must be happy about their pasties. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Nigel Farage's exclusive Brexit plan has just been revealed and it's very telling

The panic is over.

If, a week on from Brexit, you're staring at the bottom of your gin bottle and wondering whether you'll ever afford to go on holiday again, then stop worrying. 

There's a plan.

Social media users have been sharing a link to an exclusive reveal of Nigel Farage's plan for the UK departure from the EU. Users are invited to: "View The Brexit Plan that was but together by the Vote Leave campaign, UKIP and Nigel Farage.

Here it is.

Highlighted policy topics include hot potatoes like UK access to the single market, international trade agreements and the rights of EU nationals working in the UK. You just have to click on the red button.

 

Oh. 

It seems the plan might be permanently out of reach. 

Every time you try to click on the red button with your mouse, you'll discover that it leaps away to another part of the page. So far, we haven't heard of anyone who has managed to catch the elusive button and discover the details of the brilliant plan. 

Other plans that have not been very easy to click on this week include: Boris Johnson's plan to be Prime Minister, Jeremy Corbyn's plan to lead a unified Labour opposition and David Cameron's plan to win the EU referendum in the first place.

As it turns out, a week after Brexit we are still waiting for a definitive plan. In the meantime, you can read: