Opinionomics | 16 May 2012

Must-read comment and analysis. Grexit! Grexit! Grexit!

1. Economic update – May 2012: Osborne’s austerity strangles Britain (Left Foot Forward)

Tony Dolphin presents his comprehensive monthly assessment of the economic situation.

2. An equality multiplier? (Stumbling and Mumbling)

Chris Dillow looks at the possibility that equality breeds equality, and asks what this means for social policy.

3. Is Germany bluffing on Greece? (Bruegel)

Philine Schuseil rounds up the German-language press response to the possibility of Grexit.

4. How Keynes would solve the eurozone crisis (Financial Times)

Marcus Miller and Robert Skidelsky write that for a country in such desperate straits as Greece, orderly exit from the euro to regain competitiveness looks to be the best option.

5. German voters must break the Merkel mindset that got them into this (Guardian)

Greece's euro membership was as much the German elite's fault as anyone's. Can it find the leadership to resolve the crisis, asks Robin Wells

Angela Merkel murmurs to Francois Hollande. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.