Opinionomics | 11 May 2012

Must-read comment and analysis. Featuring more on the Grexit and a 101-year-old Nobel Laureate.

1. If Greece goes... (Economist | Free Exchange)

What would policymakers have to do at the moment of a Greek exit to persuade investors and depositors that Greece really was the exception proving the rule of euro unity?

2. Nobel Laureate: 'I've Been Wrong So Often, I Don't Find It Extraordinary At All' (NPR | All Things Considered)

NPR's Melissa Block speaks to Ronald Coase, 101-year-old Nobel Laureate in Economics.

3. The Unequal Impact of Inflation (ToUChstone)

Duncan Wheldon shows that over the past year high inflation has hit the poorest much harder than the high earners.

4. Derivatives trader: 'The trouble is, regulators are idiots' (The Guardian)

Joris Luyendijk speaks to a trader about City short-termism, high pay, the excitement of recent years and why he now wants a way out

5. Telegraph distorts the truth on energy bills (Left Foot Forward)

Will Straw rebuts the Telegraph's claim that green policies are adding over £200 a year to energy bills.

A lighthouse in San Francisco. Roland Coates found that lighthouses aren't a public good, as originally thought. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

GETTY
Show Hide image

The Deep Dive podcast: Mandates and Manifestos

The New Statesman's Deep Dive podcast.

Ian Leslie and Stewart Wood return for another episode of the Deep Dive. This time they're plunging into the murky world of election promises with Catherine Haddon, resident historian at the Institute of Government. Together they explore what an electoral mandate means, what a manifesto is for, and why we can't sue the government when they fail to keep their promises.

Plus: Rant or Rave? Find out which podcasts have had our hosts on tenterhooks.

Listen to this episode of The Deep Dive now:

 

0800 7318496