Opinionomics | 11 May 2012

Must-read comment and analysis. Featuring more on the Grexit and a 101-year-old Nobel Laureate.

1. If Greece goes... (Economist | Free Exchange)

What would policymakers have to do at the moment of a Greek exit to persuade investors and depositors that Greece really was the exception proving the rule of euro unity?

2. Nobel Laureate: 'I've Been Wrong So Often, I Don't Find It Extraordinary At All' (NPR | All Things Considered)

NPR's Melissa Block speaks to Ronald Coase, 101-year-old Nobel Laureate in Economics.

3. The Unequal Impact of Inflation (ToUChstone)

Duncan Wheldon shows that over the past year high inflation has hit the poorest much harder than the high earners.

4. Derivatives trader: 'The trouble is, regulators are idiots' (The Guardian)

Joris Luyendijk speaks to a trader about City short-termism, high pay, the excitement of recent years and why he now wants a way out

5. Telegraph distorts the truth on energy bills (Left Foot Forward)

Will Straw rebuts the Telegraph's claim that green policies are adding over £200 a year to energy bills.

A lighthouse in San Francisco. Roland Coates found that lighthouses aren't a public good, as originally thought. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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En français, s'il vous plaît! EU lead negotiator wants to talk Brexit in French

C'est très difficile. 

In November 2015, after the Paris attacks, Theresa May said: "Nous sommes solidaires avec vous, nous sommes tous ensemble." ("We are in solidarity with you, we are all together.")

But now the Prime Minister might have to brush up her French and take it to a much higher level.

Reuters reports the EU's lead Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, would like to hold the talks in French, not English (an EU spokeswoman said no official language had been agreed). 

As for the Home office? Aucun commentaire.

But on Twitter, British social media users are finding it all très amusant.

In the UK, foreign language teaching has suffered from years of neglect. The government may regret this now . . .

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.