Opinionomics | 4 April 2012

Must read comment and analysis. Featuring robots.

1. What Export-Oriented America Means (The American Interest)

A long-read from Tyler Cowen, covering how and why America could return to being a dominant exporter. Featuring robots.

2. Want to Bet on the 2012 Election? The CFTC Says No (Bloomberg View)

Paula Dwyer reports on the ban from the US authorities on betting on the presidential election. No such rule here, where the odds are 3:1 for a Romney victory   and evens for Obama.

3. Wall Street comes to Watton (BBC News)

Robert Peston argues that the seemingly scammy way "asymmetric cap and collar" deals were sold to small business owners could be the next banking scandal.

4. 'Polluter pays' is the only principle that can limit aviation emissions (Guardian)

The EU climate commissioner, Connie Hedegaard, lays out the case for incorporating aviation emissions into the cap-and-trade system.

5. US economy: A market on the move (Financial Times)

The FT's lead opinion piece today suggests that we could be seeing a housing recovery in America.

Are robots the key to an American recovery? Not this kind, sadly. Credit: Getty

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.