Opinionomics | 30 April 2012

Must-read comment and analysis. Examinations of the problems with austerity, youth unemployment, and

1. German Unions Seeking Higher Pay Could Save the Euro (Bloomberg View)

Simon Johnson points out that the intra-Europe rebalancing that many agree must occur for normality to resume could be greatly aided by unions – normally the scourge of neoclassical economic models.

2. Wasting Our Minds (New York Times)

Paul Krugman writes on the terrible wasted potential that results from things liek high youth unemployment.

3. The impact of fiscal austerity in the eurozone (Financial Times)

Martin Wolf repeats Krugman's examination from last week, and reaches the same conclusion: austerity is negatively correlated with growth.

4. Recovery ahoy? (Market Square)

Ian Mulheirn gives his two pence on the double-dip.

5. The facts aren't going the Coalition's way, so it has resorted to spin (Independent)

David Blanchflower assesses the coalition's job creation claims.

Danny Alexander leaves Downing Street. David Blanchflower wishes he would never come back. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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