Opinionomics | 3 April 2012

Must read comment and analysis, including a debate over risk aversion in financial regulation. Is th

1. Evidence of Nominal Wage Rigidities (Mark Thoma)

Everyone in economics knows one thing: Wages are sticky. It's hard to cut them. How hard? Thoma finds the evidence.

2. What happened at Groupon? (Felix Salmon)

Felix suggests one reason – beyond their borderline Ponzi-scheme accounting – why Groupon may be having problems

3. Welcome to Ikea-land: Furniture giant begins urban planning project (The Globe and Mail)

Ikea is building a ten-acre housing development in the Olympic Park in London, which will be an all-rental private neighbourhood.

4. The FDA approach to regulation (Economist | Free Exchange)

A.C.S. argues that the desire to make the SEC more like the FDA is mistaken...

5. Default Rules and Regulatory Agency Design (Slate | Moneybox)

...While Matt Yglesias disagrees.

Is the FDA a good model for financial regulation? Credit: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Photo: Getty
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.