Opinionomics | 2 April 2012

Must read analysis and comment. Featuring healthcare, welfare and the Euro scare.

1. Supreme court and health insurance (The Grumpy Economist)

John Cochrane presents a strong anti-Obamacare argument. He still accepts the need for healthcare reform, but as an ardent free-marketeer, wants the change to be focused on allowing the individuals more, not less, control.

2. Cameron's consistent error (Stumbling and Mumbling)

A few days old, but Chris Dillow argues that the fuel strike debacle highlights the fact that a lot of the government's errors seem based around the fact that they fail to appreciate the difference between what's best for each individual, and what's best for a government to recommend.

3. The Gold Standard and the Euro (Bruegel)

Two wonkish pieces next; the first, from Bruegel, looks at the Euro crisis now through the historical prism of the gold standard...

4. Banking Mysticism, Continued (The Conscience of a Liberal)

...and the second, from Paul Krugman, is a small primer on how banks do and don't make money.

5. Why the sun has not yet set on nuclear... (Independent)

Mark Leftly argues in favour of the continued expansion of nuclear power.

Gold bullion sits in a safe in Budapest. Credit: Getty

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.