Opinionomics | 18 April 2012

Must-read comment and analysis. Britain in the slow lane, youth unemployment speeding up, and Argent

1. Feed me, Seymour (Economist)

The Economist covers the YPF seizure, writing that:

First they came for the pensions, then they went for the central-bank reserves. Argentines have wondered for years which kitty Cristina Fernández, the president, would grab next in order to satisfy her government’s voracious appetite for cash.

2. High youth unemployment must be tackled, and fast (Guardian)

Jonathan Portes points out that youth unemployment remains high, and is still growing. It hasn't been this bad for a quarter of a century, but what is to be done?

3. IMF predicts modest growth as Europe starts to exit recession (Washington Post)

Howard Schneider reports on the good news from the IMF World Economic Outlook.

4. Economic update – April 2012: Coalition failures put Britain in the slow lane (Left Foot Forward)

Tony Dolphin presents his monthly overview of the economic situation.

5. Vodafone, C&WW, and a £5bn tax question (BBC News)

"A behind-the-scenes battle to acquire Cable & Wireless Worldwide, owner of one of the UK's largest fibre-optic cable networks, is coming to a head," writes Robert Peston. "What is striking about Cable & Wireless is that it pays very little tax thanks largely to massive capital allowances it generated in constructing its telecoms network. . . So there is an opportunity for both Tata Communications and Vodafone to reduce their UK bill for corporation tax by buying Cable & Wireless."

Protesters perform a skit during a tax day demonstration in New York City. Credit: Getty

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.