Opinionomics | 13 April 2012

Must-read comment and analysis. Featuring oil, Osborne and old people.

1. How Detroit’s adapting to higher gas prices, in one chart (Washington Post | Wonkblog)

Brad Plumer shows that, unlike in 2008, American car manufacturers are finally adapting to high oil prices.

2. The Downside to Longer Life (Slate | Moneybox)

If we all live longer, pensions will become more expensive! Isn't that a tragedy? Well, no.

3. The Swiss boson (Financial Times | alphaville)

"The Swiss boson is a hypothetical condition which is supposed to account for why the Swiss franc has ‘mass’ when all other neighbouring currencies don’t."

4. Any other Chancellor would be seeing the door by now (Tax Research UK)

Richard Murphy asks why Osborne has handled the charity clampdown, the pasty tax and, well, everything so badly.

5. On tax avoidance, allow me to leap to the defence of the super-rich (Guardian)

Nick Hytner, the director of the National Theatre, argues in favour of those "dodging" tax by giving to charity.

A South Korean activist in a Kim Jong-Un mask holds up a fake rocket. Stocks rose across east Asia on the news that North Korea's launch had failed. Credit: Getty

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.