Opinionomics: must-read analysis and comment

Featuring Marx, bank runs, and an unusual type of job creation.

1. The Age of the Shadow Bank Run (New York Times)

Tyler Cowen writes about the return of the bank run to modern finance.

2. Supreme Court and the business of waiting in line (Washington Post WonkBlog)

Sara Kliff writes about a quirk caused by the most important Supreme Court case in a generation.

3. This disgraceful budget smacks of incompetence and cowardice (Guardian Comment is Free)

This budget, this government, "is a ship of fools with the deluded at the helm," writes Will Hutton

4. Marx, capitalists and the state (Stumbling and Mumbling)

Chris Dillow examines the phrase "the executive of the modern state is but a committee for managing the common affairs of the whole bourgeoisie".

5. When austerity is self-defeating (Slate Moneybox)

Matt Yglesias reports on a new paper all about austerity, and the failings thereof.

A woman in a poncho waits in line for the Supreme Court. Credit: Getty

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.