Opinionomics | 29 March 2012

Must read analysis and comment. Featuring Tim Worstall, Ezra Klein, and – yes – pasties.

1. Britain struggles to kick its addiction to consumption (Telegraph)

Jeremy Warner seems confused, arguing that reducing Britain's addiction to consumption is much needed, but that doing so is directly and substantially harming growth. He is unclear whether we should be applauding Osborne for making his decisions with an eye on the long-term, or condemning him for not putting off the "rebalancing" until the more important matter of the ongoing depression is sorted.

2. Not a tax on pasties, but a right-wing tax on heat* (LabourList)

*Not really. Conor Pope argues – perhaps tongue-in-cheek – that liberal atomic motion within cheap savoury snacks will lead directly to the eventual disintegration of the traditional nuclear family

3. Papers I need to read: Do tax cuts really help growth? (Washington Post WonkBlog)

Ezra Klein links to a paper that fairly demolishes George Osborne's argument that tax cuts lead to growth.

4. Spiked on rare earths (Tim Worstall)

Worstall applies his day-job expertise to look at the global market for rare earth metals – not as rare as their nam implies.

5. Scotland’s economy running on empty after Osborne’s Great Stagnation Budget (Left Foot Forward)

Willie Bain MP presents a (partisan, obviously, but) well-researched account of the budget's impact on Scotland

Pasties are left to cool in a shameless tax avoidance scheme. Credit: Getty

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Supreme Court Article 50 winner demands white paper on Brexit

The Supreme Court ruled Parliament must be consulted before triggering Article 50. Grahame Pigney, of the People's Challenge, plans to build on the victory. 

A crowd-funded campaign that has forced the government to consult Parliament on Article 50 is now calling for a white paper on Brexit.

The People's Challenge worked alongside Gina Miller and other interested parties to force the government to back down over its plan to trigger Article 50 without prior parliamentary approval. 

On Tuesday morning, the Supreme Court ruled 8-3 that the government must first be authorised by an act of Parliament.

Grahame Pigney, the founder of the campaign, said: "It is absolutely great we have now got Parliament back in control, rather than decisions taken in some secret room in Whitehall.

"If this had been overturned it would have taken us back to 1687, before the Bill of Rights."

Pigney, whose campaign has raised more than £100,000, is now plannign a second campaign. He said: "The first step should be for a white paper to be brought before Parliament for debate." The demand has also been made by the Exiting the European Union select committee

The "Second People's Challenge" aims to pool legal knowledge with like-minded campaigners and protect MPs "against bullying and populist rhetoric". 

The white paper should state "what the Brexit objectives are, how (factually) they would benefit the UK, and what must happen if they are not achieved". 

The campaign will also aim to fund a Europe-facing charm offensive, with "a major effort" to ensure politicians in EU countries understand that public opinion is "not universally in favour of ‘Brexit at any price’".

Pigney, like Miller, has always maintained that he is motivated by the principle of parliamentary sovereignty, rather than a bid to stop Brexit per se.

In an interview with The Staggers, he said: "One of the things that has characterised this government is they want to keep everything secret.”

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.