Opinionomics | 29 March 2012

Must read analysis and comment. Featuring Tim Worstall, Ezra Klein, and – yes – pasties.

1. Britain struggles to kick its addiction to consumption (Telegraph)

Jeremy Warner seems confused, arguing that reducing Britain's addiction to consumption is much needed, but that doing so is directly and substantially harming growth. He is unclear whether we should be applauding Osborne for making his decisions with an eye on the long-term, or condemning him for not putting off the "rebalancing" until the more important matter of the ongoing depression is sorted.

2. Not a tax on pasties, but a right-wing tax on heat* (LabourList)

*Not really. Conor Pope argues – perhaps tongue-in-cheek – that liberal atomic motion within cheap savoury snacks will lead directly to the eventual disintegration of the traditional nuclear family

3. Papers I need to read: Do tax cuts really help growth? (Washington Post WonkBlog)

Ezra Klein links to a paper that fairly demolishes George Osborne's argument that tax cuts lead to growth.

4. Spiked on rare earths (Tim Worstall)

Worstall applies his day-job expertise to look at the global market for rare earth metals – not as rare as their nam implies.

5. Scotland’s economy running on empty after Osborne’s Great Stagnation Budget (Left Foot Forward)

Willie Bain MP presents a (partisan, obviously, but) well-researched account of the budget's impact on Scotland

Pasties are left to cool in a shameless tax avoidance scheme. Credit: Getty

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

YouTube screengrab
Show Hide image

“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian view of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.