Opinionomics | 1 June 2012

Must-read comment and analysis. Featuring goldbugs, austerians, and the 0.003%.

1. How to kickstart the UK economy – at zero cost to 99 per cent of us (Guardian)

"By imposing a capital gains tax charge at 28 per cent on the seriously rich 0.003 per cent we could create 1.5m jobs over the next two years," writes Michael Meacher

2. Debunking goldbugs (FT Alphaville)

If you think you might be a goldbug, Izabella Kaminska can give you the help you need.

3. This Collapse In US Interest Rates Is History In The Making—Here's What It Really Means (Business Insider | Money Game)

Joe Weisenthal addresses the negative interest rates issue from a US perspective

4. The End of the Euro: A Survivor's Guide (Huffington Post)

Simon Johnson and Peter Boone write on how the end of the euro could be made to work

5. Krugman savages the austerians with embarrassing ease (Left Foot Forward)

If you haven't seen it yet, Shamik Das has the transcript of Paul Krugman's slaughter of austerians.

A 100Kg gold coin from the Canadian Royal Mint. Why? Because. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Photo: Getty
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.