Opinionomics | 1 June 2012

Must-read comment and analysis. Featuring goldbugs, austerians, and the 0.003%.

1. How to kickstart the UK economy – at zero cost to 99 per cent of us (Guardian)

"By imposing a capital gains tax charge at 28 per cent on the seriously rich 0.003 per cent we could create 1.5m jobs over the next two years," writes Michael Meacher

2. Debunking goldbugs (FT Alphaville)

If you think you might be a goldbug, Izabella Kaminska can give you the help you need.

3. This Collapse In US Interest Rates Is History In The Making—Here's What It Really Means (Business Insider | Money Game)

Joe Weisenthal addresses the negative interest rates issue from a US perspective

4. The End of the Euro: A Survivor's Guide (Huffington Post)

Simon Johnson and Peter Boone write on how the end of the euro could be made to work

5. Krugman savages the austerians with embarrassing ease (Left Foot Forward)

If you haven't seen it yet, Shamik Das has the transcript of Paul Krugman's slaughter of austerians.

A 100Kg gold coin from the Canadian Royal Mint. Why? Because. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.