Is Germany falling prey to the eurocrisis?

Signs emerge that the German economy is faltering

After months of Germany playing reluctant parent to Europe through its financial woes, there are emerging signs that the German economy may be taking a hit itself.

Business Insider has reported that the latest manufacturing Purchasing Manager's Index (PMI), which measures major orders of goods and services by firms in manufacturing and non-manufacturing industries in the private sector, is showing a 36 month low, having fallen by 1.6 per cent this month.

This fall in Germany's PMI measure has been accompanied by an increase in the Spanish Exchange Traded Fund (ETF), the EWP against the German ETF, the EWG. These measures show that Spain's EWP has increased by 1 per cent whilst Germany's has fallen by 1 per cent.

Joe Weisenthal also points out that the Ifo Business Climate Index, a key measure of business confidence in the country, fell:

The Index fell to 105.3, below the 105.6 that was expected, and well below last month's 106.9.

Weisenthal explained this data as showing:

First of all, Germany's economy, as we've been writing about is cracking (finally) as all of its export markets are deteriorating.

More importantly, there's a growing sense that Germany is going to be on the hook, in some way or another, for the debts of its peers.

So even if the economy deteriorates, the Spanish market benefits from the fact that it may not go completely bust.

With the German economy begining to falter, he offers one final note of optimism:

An optimist might say that this is the best thing that could happen to Europe. After all, until Germany's economy weakens, it really has no incentive to see any kind of change, let alone economic stimulus, in Europe.

That said, Matt Yglesias at Slate has doubts:

The fact that a nation specializing in capital goods exports is vulnerable to shocks from abroad was eminently predictable so I'm not super-keen on the theory that German prosperity accounts for its political class' attitude toward the situation.

However the German public responds to the slow-down in its economy, these signs suggest that they may not be in a position to act as sole parent to Europe for much longer.

The German economy falters. Photograph: Getty Image

Helen Robb reads PPE at Oxford University where she is deputy editor of ISIS magazine.

Ukip's Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall. Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Is the general election 2017 the end of Ukip?

Ukip led the way to Brexit, but now the party is on less than 10 per cent in the polls. 

Ukip could be finished. Ukip has only ever had two MPs, but it held an outside influence on politics: without it, we’d probably never have had the EU referendum. But Brexit has turned Ukip into a single-issue party without an issue. Ukip’s sole remaining MP, Douglas Carswell, left the party in March 2017, and told Sky News’ Adam Boulton that there was “no point” to the party anymore. 

Not everyone in Ukip has given up, though: Nigel Farage told Peston on Sunday that Ukip “will survive”, and current leader Paul Nuttall will be contesting a seat this year. But Ukip is standing in fewer constituencies than last time thanks to a shortage of both money and people. Who benefits if Ukip is finished? It’s likely to be the Tories. 

Is Ukip finished? 

What are Ukip's poll ratings?

Ukip’s poll ratings peaked in June 2016 at 16 per cent. Since the leave campaign’s success, that has steadily declined so that Ukip is going into the 2017 general election on 4 per cent, according to the latest polls. If the polls can be trusted, that’s a serious collapse.

Can Ukip get anymore MPs?

In the 2015 general election Ukip contested nearly every seat and got 13 per cent of the vote, making it the third biggest party (although is only returned one MP). Now Ukip is reportedly struggling to find candidates and could stand in as few as 100 seats. Ukip leader Paul Nuttall will stand in Boston and Skegness, but both ex-leader Nigel Farage and donor Arron Banks have ruled themselves out of running this time.

How many members does Ukip have?

Ukip’s membership declined from 45,994 at the 2015 general election to 39,000 in 2016. That’s a worrying sign for any political party, which relies on grassroots memberships to put in the campaigning legwork.

What does Ukip's decline mean for Labour and the Conservatives? 

The rise of Ukip took votes from both the Conservatives and Labour, with a nationalist message that appealed to disaffected voters from both right and left. But the decline of Ukip only seems to be helping the Conservatives. Stephen Bush has written about how in Wales voting Ukip seems to have been a gateway drug for traditional Labour voters who are now backing the mainstream right; so the voters Ukip took from the Conservatives are reverting to the Conservatives, and the ones they took from Labour are transferring to the Conservatives too.

Ukip might be finished as an electoral force, but its influence on the rest of British politics will be felt for many years yet. 

0800 7318496