Opinionomics | 25 April 2012

Must-read comment and analysis. Featuring austerity, double-dips, and space.

1. How Planetary Resources Can Make a Profit (Forbes)

Tim Worstall tackles the problem Planetary Resources has - once they bring down all that platinum, platinum stops being as valuable.

2. To bin or not to bin the FTT (Financial Times | alphaville)

Masa Serdarevic argues out that the UK not joining the FTT if the rest of Europe starts one would be terrible for the City.

3. Why Are Donations to Government So Small? (Library of Economics and Liberty)

Bryan Caplan argues that most people think "that there are better and more efficient ways of using their money to help other people than giving it to government."

4. The Chancellor must ignore this double-dip recession (Telegraph)

Jeremy Warner calls for Osborne to tie himself to the mast of the good ship Austerity.

5. People Are Finally Figuring Out: Austerity is Stupid (The Bonddad Blog)

And Hale Stewart points out that that would be a terrible idea.

Planetary Resources president and chief engineer, Chris Lewicki, talks about the Arkyd Seris I satellite, seen as a full-scale mockup. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Word of the week: Michellania


Each week The Staggers will pick a new word to describe our uncharted political and socioeconomic territory. 

After brash Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump paraded his family at the national convention, the word of the week is:

Michellania (n)

A speech made of words and phrases gathered from different sources, such as Michelle Obama speeches and Rick Astley lyrics.

Usage: 

"I listened hard, but all I heard was michellania."

"Can you really tell the difference between all this michellania?"

"This michellania - you couldn't make it up."

Articles to read if you're sick of michellania:

Do you have a suggestion for next week's word? Share it in the form below.