A fall in confidence that could end in double dip

The Chancellor can no longer sit idly by.

I am beginning to sound like a broken record as the bad data news on the UK economy continues to pile up. Things on the economic front are really not good and, most worrying, are worsening fast before our very eyes.

The major release of the results of the European Commission Economic Sentiment Index, based on business and consumer surveys in August 2011, was a real shocker. The index is made up of five components based on business surveys in industry, services, manufacturing and retail, as well as a consumer survey. These are conducted in identical form in all 27 member countries and are available as a pdf file or can be downloaded as Excel files. Check them out -- they are scary!

In August, the ESI declined by 5.0 points to 97.3 in the EU and by 4.7 points to 98.3 in the euro area. This decline resulted from a broad-based deterioration in sentiment across the sectors, with losses in confidence being particularly marked in services, retail trade and among consumers. Only the construction sector in the euro area recorded an improvement.

Among the largest member states, Germany (-5.7 points) and the UK (-5.6) reported the strongest decreases in sentiment, followed by Poland (-3.6), the Netherlands (-3.0) and, to a lesser extent, Italy (-0.7), while the ESI remained broadly unchanged in Spain (-0.3). The ESI remains above its long-term average only in Germany and stands at 92.9 in the UK, having fallen from 104.6 in March.

Consumer confidence has continued its steady fall and is now at around the same level it was in May 2009 -- and it continues to drop.

Retail and services confidence

Of particular concern in the UK, though, was the dramatic collapse in confidence among businesses in services and retail. This is illustrated in the graph (above), which shows the sharp fall in both surveys over the past three or four months. This is of particular concern, given that the two surveys tracked very well the collapse of output at the onset of recession.

The two surveys started to fall sharply from March 2008 as the economy headed into recession, which was dated as starting in the second quarter of 2008, based on negative GDP growth.

We are able to explore further the reasons for the fall in both sectors as the European Commission provides more disaggregated detail. It is apparent that in both sectors, demand has fallen markedly and expectations for the future are increasingly pessimistic. Retailers are reporting rising inventory levels due to lack of sales.

 

Evidence of doom and gloom in the massive service sector was also reported on Tuesday in the CBI's survey of service-sector firms. Business volumes fell in the UK services sector in the past quarter, at the fastest rate since November 2009, the CBI found. Firms in business and professional services, which had been growing slowly, saw volumes contract unexpectedly.

Volumes of business in consumer services also fell -- and at the fastest rate since November 2009. Richard Woolhouse, the CBI's Head of Fiscal Policy, said:

Activity has fallen across the services sector for the first time since November 2009. This quarter we've seen more evidence of the ongoing decline in consumer services spending, as people with increasingly squeezed household incomes are forced to cut back their discretionary spending.

The concern is that this drop in business and consumer confidence is a prelude to a double-dip recession. I assume that the Chancellor George Osborne will continue to assert that his policies are working. Now that both businesses and consumers are running scared, however, Osborne can no longer sit idly by and assert that all is well. It is time for further fiscal stimulus.

David Blanchflower is economics editor of the New Statesman and professor of economics at Dartmouth College, New Hampshire

Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Who will win in Manchester Gorton?

Will Labour lose in Manchester Gorton?

The death of Gerald Kaufman will trigger a by-election in his Manchester Gorton seat, which has been Labour-held since 1935.

Coming so soon after the disappointing results in Copeland – where the seat was lost to the Tories – and Stoke – where the party lost vote share – some overly excitable commentators are talking up the possibility of an upset in the Manchester seat.

But Gorton is very different to Stoke-on-Trent and to Copeland. The Labour lead is 56 points, compared to 16.5 points in Stoke-on-Trent and 6.5 points in Copeland. (As I’ve written before and will doubtless write again, it’s much more instructive to talk about vote share rather than vote numbers in British elections. Most of the country tends to vote in the same way even if they vote at different volumes.)

That 47 per cent of the seat's residents come from a non-white background and that the Labour party holds every council seat in the constituency only adds to the party's strong position here. 

But that doesn’t mean that there is no interest to be had in the contest at all. That the seat voted heavily to remain in the European Union – around 65 per cent according to Chris Hanretty’s estimates – will provide a glimmer of hope to the Liberal Democrats that they can finish a strong second, as they did consistently from 1992 to 2010, before slumping to fifth in 2015.

How they do in second place will inform how jittery Labour MPs with smaller majorities and a history of Liberal Democrat activity are about Labour’s embrace of Brexit.

They also have a narrow chance of becoming competitive should Labour’s selection turn acrimonious. The seat has been in special measures since 2004, which means the selection will be run by the party’s national executive committee, though several local candidates are tipped to run, with Afzal Khan,  a local MEP, and Julie Reid, a local councillor, both expected to run for the vacant seats.

It’s highly unlikely but if the selection occurs in a way that irritates the local party or provokes serious local in-fighting, you can just about see how the Liberal Democrats give everyone a surprise. But it’s about as likely as the United States men landing on Mars any time soon – plausible, but far-fetched. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.