Gordon Taylor is not a royal princess

A key question at today’s select committee hearing.

You would not easily mistake Gordon Taylor, the former Chief Executive of the Professional Footballers Association, for Kate Middleton, or any other member of the royal household.

That is why when the question came today at the select committee hearing, it was lethal. It was a simple and beautiful question, and it was asked by Paul Farrelly MP.

Did James Murdoch realise that Gordon Taylor was not a member of the royal household? The import of the question is that, at the time News International negotiated and settled the civil claim of Taylor for having his phone hacked, it was still maintaining the fiction that the illegal interceptions were limited to its "rogue" former royal editor, Clive Goodman. But Taylor would have been of no interest to Goodman.

So putting the fiction aside, it was manifestly obvious to any sensible person when the news of the Taylor claim reached senior executives at News International that the "one rogue reporter" narrative could no longer be sustained. But News International did carry on with this untruth until only a few months ago.

At the time of the Taylor settlement, James Murdoch did not either know or care who Gordon Taylor was, and he did not know or care whether the "one rogue reporter" story was true or not. That is unless, of course, James Murdoch actually did think Gordon Taylor was a member of the royal family all along.

David Allen Green is legal correspondent of the New Statesman.

David Allen Green is legal correspondent of the New Statesman and author of the Jack of Kent blog.

His legal journalism has included popularising the Simon Singh libel case and discrediting the Julian Assange myths about his extradition case.  His uncovering of the Nightjack email hack by the Times was described as "masterly analysis" by Lord Justice Leveson.

David is also a solicitor and was successful in the "Twitterjoketrial" appeal at the High Court.

(Nothing on this blog constitutes legal advice.)

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The section on climate change has already disappeared from the White House website

As soon as Trump was president, the page on climate change started showing an error message.

Melting sea ice, sad photographs of polar bears, scientists' warnings on the Guardian homepage. . . these days, it's hard to avoid the question of climate change. This mole's anxiety levels are rising faster than the sea (and that, unfortunately, is saying something).

But there is one place you can go for a bit of respite: the White House website.

Now that Donald Trump is president of the United States, we can all scroll through the online home of the highest office in the land without any niggling worries about that troublesome old man-made existential threat. That's because the minute that Trump finished his inauguration speech, the White House website's page about climate change went offline.

Here's what the page looked like on January 1st:

And here's what it looks like now that Donald Trump is president:

The perfect summary of Trump's attitude to global warming.

Now, the only references to climate on the website is Trump's promise to repeal "burdensome regulations on our energy industry", such as, er. . . the Climate Action Plan.

This mole tries to avoid dramatics, but really: are we all doomed?

I'm a mole, innit.