Gordon Taylor is not a royal princess

A key question at today’s select committee hearing.

You would not easily mistake Gordon Taylor, the former Chief Executive of the Professional Footballers Association, for Kate Middleton, or any other member of the royal household.

That is why when the question came today at the select committee hearing, it was lethal. It was a simple and beautiful question, and it was asked by Paul Farrelly MP.

Did James Murdoch realise that Gordon Taylor was not a member of the royal household? The import of the question is that, at the time News International negotiated and settled the civil claim of Taylor for having his phone hacked, it was still maintaining the fiction that the illegal interceptions were limited to its "rogue" former royal editor, Clive Goodman. But Taylor would have been of no interest to Goodman.

So putting the fiction aside, it was manifestly obvious to any sensible person when the news of the Taylor claim reached senior executives at News International that the "one rogue reporter" narrative could no longer be sustained. But News International did carry on with this untruth until only a few months ago.

At the time of the Taylor settlement, James Murdoch did not either know or care who Gordon Taylor was, and he did not know or care whether the "one rogue reporter" story was true or not. That is unless, of course, James Murdoch actually did think Gordon Taylor was a member of the royal family all along.

David Allen Green is legal correspondent of the New Statesman.

David Allen Green is legal correspondent of the New Statesman and author of the Jack of Kent blog.

His legal journalism has included popularising the Simon Singh libel case and discrediting the Julian Assange myths about his extradition case.  His uncovering of the Nightjack email hack by the Times was described as "masterly analysis" by Lord Justice Leveson.

David is also a solicitor and was successful in the "Twitterjoketrial" appeal at the High Court.

(Nothing on this blog constitutes legal advice.)

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.