Gordon Taylor is not a royal princess

A key question at today’s select committee hearing.

You would not easily mistake Gordon Taylor, the former Chief Executive of the Professional Footballers Association, for Kate Middleton, or any other member of the royal household.

That is why when the question came today at the select committee hearing, it was lethal. It was a simple and beautiful question, and it was asked by Paul Farrelly MP.

Did James Murdoch realise that Gordon Taylor was not a member of the royal household? The import of the question is that, at the time News International negotiated and settled the civil claim of Taylor for having his phone hacked, it was still maintaining the fiction that the illegal interceptions were limited to its "rogue" former royal editor, Clive Goodman. But Taylor would have been of no interest to Goodman.

So putting the fiction aside, it was manifestly obvious to any sensible person when the news of the Taylor claim reached senior executives at News International that the "one rogue reporter" narrative could no longer be sustained. But News International did carry on with this untruth until only a few months ago.

At the time of the Taylor settlement, James Murdoch did not either know or care who Gordon Taylor was, and he did not know or care whether the "one rogue reporter" story was true or not. That is unless, of course, James Murdoch actually did think Gordon Taylor was a member of the royal family all along.

David Allen Green is legal correspondent of the New Statesman.

David Allen Green is legal correspondent of the New Statesman and author of the Jack of Kent blog.

His legal journalism has included popularising the Simon Singh libel case and discrediting the Julian Assange myths about his extradition case.  His uncovering of the Nightjack email hack by the Times was described as "masterly analysis" by Lord Justice Leveson.

David is also a solicitor and was successful in the "Twitterjoketrial" appeal at the High Court.

(Nothing on this blog constitutes legal advice.)

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Westminster terror attack: What we know so far

The attack, which left a police officer and bystanders dead, was an attack on democracy. 

We had just wrapped up recording this week's podcast and I was on my way back to Westminster when it happened: the first terrorist attack on Parliament since the killing of Airey Neave in 1979. You can read an account of the day here.

Here's what we know so far:

  • Four people, including the attacker, have died following a terrorist attack at Westminster. Keith Palmer, a police officer, was killed defending Parliament as the attacker attempted to rush the gates.
  • 29 people are in hospital, seven in critical condition.
  • Three French high school students are among those who were injured in the attack.
  • The attacker, who was known to the security services, has been named as Khalid Masood, a 52-year-old British born man from Birmingham, is believed to have been a lone wolf though he was inspired by international terrorist attacks. 

The proximity of so many members of the press - including George, who has written up his experience here - meant that it was very probably the most well-documented terrorist attack in British history. But it wasn't an attack on the press, though I'd be lying to you if I said I wasn't thinking about what might have happened if we had finished recording a little earlier.

It was an attack on our politicians and our Parliament and what it represents: of democracy and, ultimately, the rights of all people to self-determination and self-government. It's a reminder too of the risk that everyone who enters politics take and how lucky we are to have them.

It was also a reminder of something I take for granted every day: that if an attack happens, I get to run away from it while the police run towards it. One of their number made the ultimate sacrifice yesterday and many more police and paramedics had to walk towards the scene at a time when they didn't know if there was another attacker out there.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.