Should Oxbridge be abolished for undergraduates?

The Friday Question: why not turn Oxford and Cambridge into postgraduate universities?

The universities of Oxford and Cambridge appear to have an incurable and inherent bias towards applicants from the minority of schools that are well-resourced to prepare their pupils for Oxbridge entrance.

The heavy emphasis on research and international scholarship means that many Oxbridge academics are also unable or unwilling to teach undergraduates on the scale that an undergraduate university really requires.

An Oxbridge undergraduate experience will, of course, provide significant future benefits to the very small number of lucky undergraduates who actually do get a place, and who can get the attention of a tutor to teach them.

But is this really the best use to which these ancient and famous universities can be put? And is the price of social exclusion one worth paying?

Can we keep Oxford and Cambridge as international centres of learning, but lose the effects of social exclusion caused by the inevitably socially biased admissions regime for bachelor degrees?

Can we break the hold that Oxbridge undergraduates have over so many areas of public and professional life, but keep the academic reputations of the two universities intact?

Shouldn't we just turn Oxford and Cambridge into postgraduate universities?

 

David Allen Green was educated at a comprehensive school, a local tertiary college, and Oxford University.

David Allen Green is legal correspondent of the New Statesman and author of the Jack of Kent blog.

His legal journalism has included popularising the Simon Singh libel case and discrediting the Julian Assange myths about his extradition case.  His uncovering of the Nightjack email hack by the Times was described as "masterly analysis" by Lord Justice Leveson.

David is also a solicitor and was successful in the "Twitterjoketrial" appeal at the High Court.

(Nothing on this blog constitutes legal advice.)

Getty
Show Hide image

Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

0800 7318496