The return of the rule of law?

Why recent arrests and prosecutions should be welcomed.

Throughout the first decade of the 21st century, there was a steady buzz of illegal activity. While Tony Blair moralised, and Alistair Campbell and Peter Mandelson spun, it appears that everyone was at it: parliamentarians making fraudulent expenses claims and the popular press hacking mobile telephones on an industrial scale.

For many powerful people in the United Kingdom, the criminal law became something that only applied to other people. As supposedly progressive politicians and tabloid newspapers clamoured for "crackdowns on crime", it was they who were engaged in elaborate criminal enterprises. As speeches and editorials insulted human rights and civil liberties lawyers, it was the speech-makers and tabloid editors who availed themselves of expensive legal advice on how to evade accountability for their unlawful activity.

The one hopeful sign of the current arrests and prosecutions is that this unlawful activity was not sustainable in the long run. It seems that the rule of law has again been asserted. Members of Parliament and journalists are not above the criminal law. The arrests and prosecutions are not signs of a political and media system malfunctioning; they are instead signs of a healthy polity.

 

David Allen Green is legal correspondent of the New Statesman and a practising media lawyer.

David Allen Green is legal correspondent of the New Statesman and author of the Jack of Kent blog.

His legal journalism has included popularising the Simon Singh libel case and discrediting the Julian Assange myths about his extradition case.  His uncovering of the Nightjack email hack by the Times was described as "masterly analysis" by Lord Justice Leveson.

David is also a solicitor and was successful in the "Twitterjoketrial" appeal at the High Court.

(Nothing on this blog constitutes legal advice.)

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Sarah Champion wants to un-resign and join Jeremy Corbyn's shadow cabinet again

The MP is understood to have emailed asking for her job back. 

Sarah Champion, MP for Rotherham, is to rejoin the shadow cabinet less than a month after her dramatic resignation. 

On 28 June, in the aftermath of Brexit, she tweeted: "I have just stepped down from my shadow minister job, but not my responsibilities to my constituents, party or victims of abuse."

Now, she has reportedly emailed Jeremy Corbyn's team to request an un-resignation from her position as shadow minister for preventing abuse. 

According to the Guido Fawkes blog, she wrote: "I would like to formally retract my resignation and ask to be reinstated to my role as Shadow Home Office minister for preventing abuse and domestic violence with immediate effect."

Unsurprisingly, perhaps, given their staffing issues on the shadow cabinet, the Corbyn team is understood to be welcoming her back. 

Shadow chancellor John McDonnell has repeatedly urged ex-shadow cabinet MPs to come back. On 1 July he said: "Wouldn't it be better if people came back and worked with us?"

And on Sunday, he alarmed weekend TV viewers by turning straight to camera and telling the nation: "We've got to stop this now."