The Friday Arts Diary

Our cultural picks for the week ahead.

Art 

Serpentine Gallery, London, W2: Yoko Ono: To The Light, 19 June – 9 September

The first London exhibition of Yoko Ono’s work for a decade, To The Lights surveys the 50-year career of an artist who may, after her lifetime achievement award at the 2009 Venice Biennale, have finally succeeded in turning the spotlight away from her marriage to John Lennon and onto her art. Featuring key works, archive material and new installations, films and performances, the exhibition will draw out enduring themes in Ono’s work, not least her faith in the sixties’ ideals of ‘peace and love’, seen in new participatory project SMILE, which uses multimedia to collate the smiles of those who view her work.

Film    

BFI Southbank, London, SE1: Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry + Q&A with Alison Klayman, 17 June

Alison Klayman’s timely and engrossing documentary follows dissident Chinese artist Ai Weiwei over three years, from the Tate Modern sunflower seeds installation of 2009 to his two-and-a-half month detention by the Chinese authorities in 2011.  Klayman gains unprecedented access to Weiwei at a time when his social networking activity and growing international reputation are met by intensified government censorship. Catch this sensitive and ultimately celebratory film at BFI Southbank together with a Q&A with Klayman.

Theatre 

New Diorama Theatre, London, NW1: Borges and I, Idle Motion Theatre Company, 19 – 23 June

Fringe success Idle Motion return with their award-winning show about Argentinian writer and poet Jorge Luis Borges. Borges and I interweaves scenes from Borges’s life and writings, which lend themselves to Idle Motion’s distinctive blend of prop-based visual and physical theatre, honed since the actors’ met at school. The multimedia show portrays Borges on the brink of blindness, and features fantastical imagery from labyrinths and tigers to a love story and universe of libraries.

Music

Barbican Hall, London, EC2Y: Sir Simon Rattle/Vienna Philharmonic, 17 June

Grab a ticket to see Sir Simon Rattle and the Vienna Philharmonic perform the Third Symphonies of Schumann and Brahms in a programme of musical borrowing. Brahms’s romantic, evocative work, written in 1883, borrows from Schumann’s symphony, known as the "Rhenish" after a happy visit to the Rhineland with his wife Clara. Rattle’s much-publicised tenure at the Berlin Philharmonic has seen a focus on the German Expressionist canon, notably at the Proms in 2010. Here he conducts the dramatic and challenging Six Pieces for Orchestra by Webern, who continued the German musical legacy by borrowing from Brahms, with an orchestra no less renowned for its skill and sound.

Festivals  

Various UK locations: London Festival 2012, 21 June – 9 September

Thursday sees the start of the London 2012 Festival, the culmination of the four-year Cultural Olympiad leading up to the Olympic Games. The festival will be Britain’s biggest, with some 12,000 events and performances of dance, music, theatre, film and much more across the country. Highlights include the World Shakespeare Festival and Big Dance 2012, the country’s largest ever celebration of dance. Events to mark the opening include The Voyage, an interactive spectacle from 21 – 24 June in Birmingham city centre; a pyrotechnic firework extravaganza above Lake Windermere on 21 June; and the Peace One Day Global Truce concert in Londonderry. Visit the website to download a brochure.

Thinker and dissident: Ai Weiwei is the subject of a new documentary (Photo: Peter Parks/Getty Images)
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The Autumn Statement proved it – we need a real alternative to austerity, now

Theresa May’s Tories have missed their chance to rescue the British economy.

After six wasted years of failed Conservative austerity measures, Philip Hammond had the opportunity last month in the Autumn Statement to change course and put in place the economic policies that would deliver greater prosperity, and make sure it was fairly shared.

Instead, he chose to continue with cuts to public services and in-work benefits while failing to deliver the scale of investment needed to secure future prosperity. The sense of betrayal is palpable.

The headline figures are grim. An analysis by the Institute for Fiscal Studies shows that real wages will not recover their 2008 levels even after 2020. The Tories are overseeing a lost decade in earnings that is, in the words Paul Johnson, the director of the IFS, “dreadful” and unprecedented in modern British history.

Meanwhile, the Treasury’s own analysis shows the cuts falling hardest on the poorest 30 per cent of the population. The Office for Budget Responsibility has reported that it expects a £122bn worsening in the public finances over the next five years. Of this, less than half – £59bn – is due to the Tories’ shambolic handling of Brexit. Most of the rest is thanks to their mishandling of the domestic economy.

 

Time to invest

The Tories may think that those people who are “just about managing” are an electoral demographic, but for Labour they are our friends, neighbours and the people we represent. People in all walks of life needed something better from this government, but the Autumn Statement was a betrayal of the hopes that they tried to raise beforehand.

Because the Tories cut when they should have invested, we now have a fundamentally weak economy that is unprepared for the challenges of Brexit. Low investment has meant that instead of installing new machinery, or building the new infrastructure that would support productive high-wage jobs, we have an economy that is more and more dependent on low-productivity, low-paid work. Every hour worked in the US, Germany or France produces on average a third more than an hour of work here.

Labour has different priorities. We will deliver the necessary investment in infrastructure and research funding, and back it up with an industrial strategy that can sustain well-paid, secure jobs in the industries of the future such as renewables. We will fight for Britain’s continued tariff-free access to the single market. We will reverse the tax giveaways to the mega-rich and the giant companies, instead using the money to make sure the NHS and our education system are properly funded. In 2020 we will introduce a real living wage, expected to be £10 an hour, to make sure every job pays a wage you can actually live on. And we will rebuild and transform our economy so no one and no community is left behind.

 

May’s missing alternative

This week, the Bank of England governor, Mark Carney, gave an important speech in which he hit the proverbial nail on the head. He was completely right to point out that societies need to redistribute the gains from trade and technology, and to educate and empower their citizens. We are going through a lost decade of earnings growth, as Carney highlights, and the crisis of productivity will not be solved without major government investment, backed up by an industrial strategy that can deliver growth.

Labour in government is committed to tackling the challenges of rising inequality, low wage growth, and driving up Britain’s productivity growth. But it is becoming clearer each day since Theresa May became Prime Minister that she, like her predecessor, has no credible solutions to the challenges our economy faces.

 

Crisis in Italy

The Italian people have decisively rejected the changes to their constitution proposed by Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, with nearly 60 per cent voting No. The Italian economy has not grown for close to two decades. A succession of governments has attempted to introduce free-market policies, including slashing pensions and undermining rights at work, but these have had little impact.

Renzi wanted extra powers to push through more free-market reforms, but he has now resigned after encountering opposition from across the Italian political spectrum. The absence of growth has left Italian banks with €360bn of loans that are not being repaid. Usually, these debts would be written off, but Italian banks lack the reserves to be able to absorb the losses. They need outside assistance to survive.

 

Bail in or bail out

The oldest bank in the world, Monte dei Paschi di Siena, needs €5bn before the end of the year if it is to avoid collapse. Renzi had arranged a financing deal but this is now under threat. Under new EU rules, governments are not allowed to bail out banks, like in the 2008 crisis. This is intended to protect taxpayers. Instead, bank investors are supposed to take a loss through a “bail-in”.

Unusually, however, Italian bank investors are not only big financial institutions such as insurance companies, but ordinary households. One-third of all Italian bank bonds are held by households, so a bail-in would hit them hard. And should Italy’s banks fail, the danger is that investors will pull money out of banks across Europe, causing further failures. British banks have been reducing their investments in Italy, but concerned UK regulators have asked recently for details of their exposure.

John McDonnell is the shadow chancellor


John McDonnell is Labour MP for Hayes and Harlington and has been shadow chancellor since September 2015. 

This article first appeared in the 08 December 2016 issue of the New Statesman, Brexit to Trump