Microsoft's social network

This week, Microsoft radically extended the services offered on their live.com service. Previously i

It’s a key strike in the MS strategy to win back some ground from Google, offering a tight integration with the Windows ecosystem and laying the foundations for the upcoming introduction of Windows 7 next year. Despite the picasa/ flickr alternatives and file sharing servives, the overwhelming sensation is one of being connected - the ‘Live Profiles’ feature in particular representing a clear challenge to the current leaders of the social networking scene. Redmond needs to do something fast. With the botched launch of Vista still smarting and browser-based applications beginning to eat away at their boxed-product market share, moving aggressively towards the socialised web app space is the only real option.

Of course, you’d be right to be suspicious. The instinctive and accepted response to Microsoft attempting to do anything which involves humanity (such as social networking or even comedic advertising) is of course howls of derisive laughter. The idea that the uber-capitalist machine is incapable of delivering anything like the warmth of community that something like Facebook can create is crazy because they’re simply too, y’know, Microsoft.

But, whilst every atom in my body distrusts their them, the numbers once again batter me into submission. The way in which MS can win this is through what is often perceived as one of their most trivial and inane distractions : Instant Messaging. Their Windows Live Messenger client (formally MSN Messenger) boasts some 268 million individual users worldwide, all of whom need simply to log into the new live.com site to slouch over to it and adopt it as their social-network home of choice. Just to log-in in the service is to be effortlessly and instantaneously connected to all your msn pals the world over. They likely already have their trojan installed on your machine, and one of your family is chatting to their friends on it.

Iain Simons writes, talks and tweets about videogames and technology. His new book, Play Britannia, is to be published in 2009. He is the director of the GameCity festival at Nottingham Trent University.
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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.