Microsoft's social network

This week, Microsoft radically extended the services offered on their live.com service. Previously i

It’s a key strike in the MS strategy to win back some ground from Google, offering a tight integration with the Windows ecosystem and laying the foundations for the upcoming introduction of Windows 7 next year. Despite the picasa/ flickr alternatives and file sharing servives, the overwhelming sensation is one of being connected - the ‘Live Profiles’ feature in particular representing a clear challenge to the current leaders of the social networking scene. Redmond needs to do something fast. With the botched launch of Vista still smarting and browser-based applications beginning to eat away at their boxed-product market share, moving aggressively towards the socialised web app space is the only real option.

Of course, you’d be right to be suspicious. The instinctive and accepted response to Microsoft attempting to do anything which involves humanity (such as social networking or even comedic advertising) is of course howls of derisive laughter. The idea that the uber-capitalist machine is incapable of delivering anything like the warmth of community that something like Facebook can create is crazy because they’re simply too, y’know, Microsoft.

But, whilst every atom in my body distrusts their them, the numbers once again batter me into submission. The way in which MS can win this is through what is often perceived as one of their most trivial and inane distractions : Instant Messaging. Their Windows Live Messenger client (formally MSN Messenger) boasts some 268 million individual users worldwide, all of whom need simply to log into the new live.com site to slouch over to it and adopt it as their social-network home of choice. Just to log-in in the service is to be effortlessly and instantaneously connected to all your msn pals the world over. They likely already have their trojan installed on your machine, and one of your family is chatting to their friends on it.

Iain Simons writes, talks and tweets about videogames and technology. His new book, Play Britannia, is to be published in 2009. He is the director of the GameCity festival at Nottingham Trent University.
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How Theresa May laid a trap for herself on the immigration target

When Home Secretary, she insisted on keeping foreign students in the figures – causing a headache for herself today.

When Home Secretary, Theresa May insisted that foreign students should continue to be counted in the overall immigration figures. Some cabinet colleagues, including then Business Secretary Vince Cable and Chancellor George Osborne wanted to reverse this. It was economically illiterate. Current ministers, like the Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, Chancellor Philip Hammond and Home Secretary Amber Rudd, also want foreign students exempted from the total.

David Cameron’s government aimed to cut immigration figures – including overseas students in that aim meant trying to limit one of the UK’s crucial financial resources. They are worth £25bn to the UK economy, and their fees make up 14 per cent of total university income. And the impact is not just financial – welcoming foreign students is diplomatically and culturally key to Britain’s reputation and its relationship with the rest of the world too. Even more important now Brexit is on its way.

But they stayed in the figures – a situation that, along with counterproductive visa restrictions also introduced by May’s old department, put a lot of foreign students off studying here. For example, there has been a 44 per cent decrease in the number of Indian students coming to Britain to study in the last five years.

Now May’s stubbornness on the migration figures appears to have caught up with her. The Times has revealed that the Prime Minister is ready to “soften her longstanding opposition to taking foreign students out of immigration totals”. It reports that she will offer to change the way the numbers are calculated.

Why the u-turn? No 10 says the concession is to ensure the Higher and Research Bill, key university legislation, can pass due to a Lords amendment urging the government not to count students as “long-term migrants” for “public policy purposes”.

But it will also be a factor in May’s manifesto pledge (and continuation of Cameron’s promise) to cut immigration to the “tens of thousands”. Until today, ministers had been unclear about whether this would be in the manifesto.

Now her u-turn on student figures is being seized upon by opposition parties as “massaging” the migration figures to meet her target. An accusation for which May only has herself, and her steadfast politicising of immigration, to blame.

Anoosh Chakelian is senior writer at the New Statesman.

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