SFTW: Somersault Game

Every week Iain Simons chooses a game for you to while away a few hours at your desk. This time it's

Ordinarily I wouldn’t put forward games that required a further plug-in, but this is well worth the effort.

Somersault is on the surface a simple bouncing ball game in which you guide a character through a course, traversing all manner of hazards to reach your goal. What sets it apart though, is the control scheme with which you drive the ball. Strokes of the mouse allow you to draw a paddle on screen, and keeping the button pressed allows you to swing the paddle on its end batting the ball around. Helpfully, the projected path of your ball is drawn ahead of you in rainbow-coloured lines - it’s fair to say that without those guides there the game would be a frustrating experience.

The game enjoys a simple, clean aesthetic which looks a lot like the early VR environments of a few years ago and has plenty of fun with its environment design. As Bally makes his way through a the kitchen level, wine glasses are toppled, knives are unsheathed and if you’re very unlucky you might find yourself in a blender faced with the question, ‘will it blend?’ The answer probably won’t please you…

Play Somersault Game

Iain Simons writes, talks and tweets about videogames and technology. His new book, Play Britannia, is to be published in 2009. He is the director of the GameCity festival at Nottingham Trent University.
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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.