Evolution of LittleBigPlanet

With so much discussion in creative education about the barriers between arts and science work such

This is what a modern creative industry looks like.

A few weeks before the global release of LittleBigPlanet, their much anticipated Playstation 3 project, the artists at Media Molecule have released a fascinating piece of process film for those who need their faculty of wonder stimulating.

You’ll know that software is made up of thousands of lines of code. In order for teams to collaborate effectively and for large projects to be managed, everytime a line of code is altered these changes are checked into a central repository. The evolution of LittleBigPlanet documents the development of the project through entries in its source-control repository. All of these entries have been visualised using codeswarm software, which results in a hypnotic piece.

Some explanation. Each of the dots in the film represents a piece of code, which swarms toward the team member who is editing it at that time. Watch the film with an eye on the ticking calender at the bottom right, and you have a document of both sheer effort of the company and the steady staff growth of a start-up as names are gradually added to the chart.

With so much discussion in creative education about the barriers between arts and science and the drop-off in foundation science skills, work such as that by Media Molecule is hugely invigorating. With a total disregard for any divisions of specialism, the scientists are the artists are the scientists. Why isn’t this on TV?

Watch The Evolution of LittleBigPlanet in HD

Iain Simons writes, talks and tweets about videogames and technology. His new book, Play Britannia, is to be published in 2009. He is the director of the GameCity festival at Nottingham Trent University.
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Could Jeremy Corbyn still be excluded from the leadership race? The High Court will rule today

Labour donor Michael Foster has applied for a judgement. 

If you thought Labour's National Executive Committee's decision to let Jeremy Corbyn automatically run again for leader was the end of it, think again. 

Today, the High Court will decide whether the NEC made the right judgement - or if Corbyn should have been forced to seek nominations from 51 MPs, which would effectively block him from the ballot.

The legal challenge is brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate. Corbyn is listed as one of the defendants.

Before the NEC decision, both Corbyn's team and the rebel MPs sought legal advice.

Foster has maintained he is simply seeking the views of experts. 

Nevertheless, he has clashed with Corbyn before. He heckled the Labour leader, whose party has been racked with anti-Semitism scandals, at a Labour Friends of Israel event in September 2015, where he demanded: "Say the word Israel."

But should the judge decide in favour of Foster, would the Labour leadership challenge really be over?

Dr Peter Catterall, a reader in history at Westminster University and a specialist in opposition studies, doesn't think so. He said: "The Labour party is a private institution, so unless they are actually breaking the law, it seems to me it is about how you interpret the rules of the party."

Corbyn's bid to be personally mentioned on the ballot paper was a smart move, he said, and the High Court's decision is unlikely to heal wounds.

 "You have to ask yourself, what is the point of doing this? What does success look like?" he said. "Will it simply reinforce the idea that Mr Corbyn is being made a martyr by people who are out to get him?"