Revisiting Text-based Games

Each week Iain Simons finds you a game to while away a few hours at your desk. This week's Something

A little history.

There was a time, not twenty years ago, when some of the most popular video games in the world consisted solely of text. Acts of startling imagination and brutal violence were executed on screen with a simple string of words: "hit the grue with the Elvish sword."

For those who are utterly tired of retinal over-stimulation, the ‘ancient’ world of interactive-fiction can provide some welcome respite. This form of video game has a rich heritage, but one of the most loved and renowned developers of the form was the American company ‘Infocom’ - who created a long line of seminal titles. Their work was rich, literary and paid special attention to packaging, creating not just boxes that held software - but rich bundles of gifts which contained clue-books, badges and other fun ephemera which fed into the experience. (These ‘feelies’ also functioned as elaborate anti-piracy devices, with some of the games being unsolvable without clues contained in the packaging.) They even attracted high-profile literary collaborators, with no less than Douglas Adams himself working on their acclaimed version of the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.

Perhaps their best loved title though, was their first - Zork. Following in the footsteps of the seminal ‘Colossal Cave’, this game trod what was to be familiar ground for this kind of work. Playful, witty, literary and on occasion - utterly frustrating.

Fortunately, much of their work is now available and playable online. Today I’m happy to direct you to a java-version of the z-machine (their game engine) which will allow you to play many of their brilliant works online. Be warned, these will take you a lot longer than an hour to play - but the effort will be worth it.

Infocom home

Play Zork Online

Play All Infocom Adventures online

Iain Simons writes, talks and tweets about videogames and technology. His new book, Play Britannia, is to be published in 2009. He is the director of the GameCity festival at Nottingham Trent University.
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SRSLY #20: Friends, Lovers, Divers

On the pop culture podcast this week, we talk albums from Joanna Newsom, Bjork and Grimes, Todd Haynes film Carol, and comedy web series Ex-Best.

This is SRSLY, the pop culture podcast from the New Statesman. Here, you can find links to all the things we talk about in the show as well as a bit more detail about who we are and where else you can find us online.

Listen to our new episode now:

...or subscribe in iTunes. We’re also on Stitcher, RSS and SoundCloud – but if you use a podcast app that we’re not appearing in, let us know.

SRSLY is hosted by Caroline Crampton and Anna Leszkiewicz, the NS’s web editor and editorial assistant. We’re on Twitter as @c_crampton and @annaleszkie, where between us we post a heady mixture of Serious Journalism, excellent gifs and regularly ask questions J K Rowling needs to answer.

If you’d like to talk to us about the podcast or make a suggestion for something we should read or cover, you can email srslypod[at]

You can also find us on Twitter @srslypod, or send us your thoughts on tumblr here. If you like the podcast, we'd love you to leave a review on iTunes - this helps other people come across it.

The Links

Joanna Newsom, Bjork and Grimes

Joanna Newsom’s Divers doesn't seem to be on Spotify, but you can get it on iTunes here. Listen to Grimes’ Art Angels here and Bjork's Vulnicura here.

This is a good piece about Joanna Newsom.

This piece makes the comparison with Elena Ferrante that we talk about on the podcast.

Here's Grimes's own post about Bjork.

Tavi Gevinson's interview with Joanna Newsom (where she talks about liking Grimes).



Ryan Gilbey's review of Carol, which he calls “as tantalising as hearing a tender ballad on a tinpot transistor”.

Anna's piece about the photographers that influenced the visual style of the film.

An interesting Q & A with director Todd Haynes.



The full series is available to watch for free here.

Meghan Murphy on friendship break-ups.


Your questions:

We love reading out your emails. If you have thoughts you want to share on anything we've discussed, or questions you want to ask us, please email us on srslypod[at], or @ us on Twitter @srslypod, or get in touch via tumblr here. We also have Facebook now.


Our theme music is “Guatemala - Panama March” (by Heftone Banjo Orchestra), licensed under Creative Commons. 


See you next week!

PS If you missed #19, check it out here.

Caroline Crampton is web editor of the New Statesman.

Anna Leszkiewicz is a pop culture writer at the New Statesman.