Campaign

Every week we give you something to while away the quiet hours at your desk. This week a knock-about

Games about politics are notoriously tricky to pull off. With so many variables in a campaign to model, an election provides a compelling challenge for artificial intelligence designers. Notable entries in the genre include Elixir Studios with their thrillingly overambitious Republic: The Revolution, and Elixir alumnus Cliff Harris’s Democracy and Democracy 2 over at his progressive indie studio Positech. Infact, the only digital element that seems to be missing from the 2008 campaigns seems to be candidate videogames - although campaign managers are still probably recalling the lonely hours they spent playing Howard Dean for America …and look what happened there.

Enter Campaign, a knock-about and stylish mix of Political strategy and turn-based warfare. In this special election edition, you can elect to play as either Obama or McCain and fight it out across the states. Having chosen your side you’re required to choose your staff making them up from a selection of skills. Fund-Raisers and Operatives are there alongside those essential Spinmeisters and Hatchet Men - all of which have their own strengths and weaknesses for you to pit against the opposition.

It’s a good looking game, but don’t let the amusing caricatures of the campaign staff fool you into thinking this is a simple pleasure. Whilst it might not be the most sophisticated political simulation on the net, it is a challenging and compelling real-time strategy game.

Playable either against the computer or an online opponent, Campaign is well worth a few clicks.

Play Campaign

Iain Simons writes, talks and tweets about videogames and technology. His new book, Play Britannia, is to be published in 2009. He is the director of the GameCity festival at Nottingham Trent University.
Getty
Show Hide image

How Theresa May laid a trap for herself on the immigration target

When Home Secretary, she insisted on keeping foreign students in the figures – causing a headache for herself today.

When Home Secretary, Theresa May insisted that foreign students should continue to be counted in the overall immigration figures. Some cabinet colleagues, including then Business Secretary Vince Cable and Chancellor George Osborne wanted to reverse this. It was economically illiterate. Current ministers, like the Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, Chancellor Philip Hammond and Home Secretary Amber Rudd, also want foreign students exempted from the total.

David Cameron’s government aimed to cut immigration figures – including overseas students in that aim meant trying to limit one of the UK’s crucial financial resources. They are worth £25bn to the UK economy, and their fees make up 14 per cent of total university income. And the impact is not just financial – welcoming foreign students is diplomatically and culturally key to Britain’s reputation and its relationship with the rest of the world too. Even more important now Brexit is on its way.

But they stayed in the figures – a situation that, along with counterproductive visa restrictions also introduced by May’s old department, put a lot of foreign students off studying here. For example, there has been a 44 per cent decrease in the number of Indian students coming to Britain to study in the last five years.

Now May’s stubbornness on the migration figures appears to have caught up with her. The Times has revealed that the Prime Minister is ready to “soften her longstanding opposition to taking foreign students out of immigration totals”. It reports that she will offer to change the way the numbers are calculated.

Why the u-turn? No 10 says the concession is to ensure the Higher and Research Bill, key university legislation, can pass due to a Lords amendment urging the government not to count students as “long-term migrants” for “public policy purposes”.

But it will also be a factor in May’s manifesto pledge (and continuation of Cameron’s promise) to cut immigration to the “tens of thousands”. Until today, ministers had been unclear about whether this would be in the manifesto.

Now her u-turn on student figures is being seized upon by opposition parties as “massaging” the migration figures to meet her target. An accusation for which May only has herself, and her steadfast politicising of immigration, to blame.

Anoosh Chakelian is senior writer at the New Statesman.

0800 7318496