Campaign

Every week we give you something to while away the quiet hours at your desk. This week a knock-about

Games about politics are notoriously tricky to pull off. With so many variables in a campaign to model, an election provides a compelling challenge for artificial intelligence designers. Notable entries in the genre include Elixir Studios with their thrillingly overambitious Republic: The Revolution, and Elixir alumnus Cliff Harris’s Democracy and Democracy 2 over at his progressive indie studio Positech. Infact, the only digital element that seems to be missing from the 2008 campaigns seems to be candidate videogames - although campaign managers are still probably recalling the lonely hours they spent playing Howard Dean for America …and look what happened there.

Enter Campaign, a knock-about and stylish mix of Political strategy and turn-based warfare. In this special election edition, you can elect to play as either Obama or McCain and fight it out across the states. Having chosen your side you’re required to choose your staff making them up from a selection of skills. Fund-Raisers and Operatives are there alongside those essential Spinmeisters and Hatchet Men - all of which have their own strengths and weaknesses for you to pit against the opposition.

It’s a good looking game, but don’t let the amusing caricatures of the campaign staff fool you into thinking this is a simple pleasure. Whilst it might not be the most sophisticated political simulation on the net, it is a challenging and compelling real-time strategy game.

Playable either against the computer or an online opponent, Campaign is well worth a few clicks.

Play Campaign

Iain Simons writes, talks and tweets about videogames and technology. His new book, Play Britannia, is to be published in 2009. He is the director of the GameCity festival at Nottingham Trent University.
Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.