Boomshine

Each week Iain Simons finds you something for the weekend - a chance to while away some hours at you

Relax, at least to begin with.

Danny Miller’s Boomshine delivers a cloud of coloured dots which float hypnotically on the screen. Your challenge is to destroy them by choosing a point, clicking your mouse and setting off a chain reaction of explosions. The simple aim being to reach the set goal of detonations for each level. Boomshine starts off as feeling almost like a gentle therapy, with the first few levels easing you in gently to the concept.

By level 6 things have started to become a lot more challenging, considerably less relaxing but also hugely addictive as the 52 million games of it that have been played testify. Also worthy of note is the soundtrack, a piano led piece by Tim Halbert which either eases your nerves or becomes gratingly repetitious depending on your taste. The sonic design of the ‘detonations’, replaced by short tones is reminiscent of the sublime audio of the hallucinogenic 'Spheres of Chaos’ and feels like an area that could be pushed further.

Casual game developers often discuss one-button gameplay, making play as accessible as possible to the player by removing any potential complications in the interface. Boomshine takes one-button gameplay to the apex of simplicity by offering the player just one-click - per game… At least you won’t be getting any R.S.I.

Play Boomshine

Iain Simons writes, talks and tweets about videogames and technology. His new book, Play Britannia, is to be published in 2009. He is the director of the GameCity festival at Nottingham Trent University.
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Appreciate the full horror of Nigel Farage's pro-Trump speech

The former Ukip leader has appeared at a Donald Trump rally. It went exactly as you would expect.

It is with a heavy heart that I must announce Nigel Farage is at it again.

The on-again, off-again Ukip leader and current Member of the European Parliament has appeared at a Donald Trump rally to lend his support to the presidential candidate.

It was, predictably, distressing.

Farage started by telling his American audience why they, like he, should be positive.

"I come to you from the United Kingdom"

Okay, good start. Undeniably true.

"– with a message of hope –

Again, probably quite true.

Image: Clearly hopeful (Wikipedia Screenshot)

– and optimism.”

Ah.

Image: Nigel Farage in front of a poster showing immigrants who are definitely not European (Getty)

He continues: “If the little people, if the real people–”

Wait, what?

Why is Trump nodding sagely at this?

The little people?

Image: It's a plane with the name Trump on it (Wikimedia Commons)

THE LITTLE PEOPLE?

Image: It's the word Trump on the side of a skyscraper I can't cope with this (Pixel)

THE ONLY LITTLE PERSON CLOSE TO TRUMP IS RIDING A MASSIVE STUFFED LION

Image: I don't even know what to tell you. It's Trump and his wife and a child riding a stuffed lion. 

IN A PENTHOUSE

A PENTHOUSE WHICH LOOKS LIKE LIBERACE WAS LET LOOSE WITH THE GILT ON DAY FIVE OF A PARTICULARLY BAD BENDER

Image: So much gold. Just gold, everywhere.

HIS WIFE HAS SO MANY BAGS SHE HAS TO EMPLOY A BAG MAN TO CARRY THEM

Image: I did not even know there were so many styles of Louis Vuitton, and my dentists has a lot of old copies of Vogue.

Anyway. Back to Farage, who is telling the little people that they can win "against the forces of global corporatism".

 

Image: Aaaaarggghhhh (Wikipedia Screenshot)

Ugh. Okay. What next? Oh god, he's telling them they can have a Brexit moment.

“... you can beat Washington...”

“... if enough decent people...”

“...are prepared to stand up against the establishment”

Image: A screenshot from Donald Trump's Wikipedia page.

I think I need a lie down.

Watch the full clip here:

Stephanie Boland is digital assistant at the New Statesman. She tweets at @stephanieboland