Drawing a blank on Georgia

The controversy over the missing maps of Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan. Was it deliberate? Google

Google maps has been under attack this week from a variety of different parties for what was initially reported as the intentional
blanking of the maps of Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan from their database.

The Azerbaijan Press Agency reported that the information was "…removed from the server after the military operations were launched in South Ossetia."

As one might expect this drew harsh criticism from many quarters of the web.

Indeed, a quick visit to the appropriate latlong will reveal a startlingly barren strip of terrain.

Whilst a number of Countries in the region have map data which is greatly reduced in its detail, none are totally blank. The
satellite imagery available on the same site reveals that there’s definitely something there - so what’s going on?

As the blanking of maps might possibly be filed under ‘evil’, Google were rapid to deny the accusation via both its GMaps blog and
the official Google blog itself. Maps product manager Dave Marsh assured readers that Google certainly hadn’t blanked the maps in
response to the hostilities, “Data for these countries were never on Google Maps in the first place.” Marsh states that coverage of those
countries hadn’t been “launched” as yet as they weren’t satisfied with the map data available to them, essentially declaring the whole affair an issue of quality control.

Marsh finishes his post by reporting that the issue has generated a lot of feedback which they are going to learn from. Startlingly, he specifically states that Google Maps users have said they would, “..rather see even very basic coverage of a
country than see nothing at all.”

This was a position that he acknowledges, “..makes sense..”, assuring users that they were starting to prepare data for the blank countries forthwith. He closes by letting pointing users to the Google Earth application, which contains full details of Georgian roads and cities.

Even acknowledging that no deletion of cities has taken place, for a company whose mission is to, ”organise the world's information and
make it universally accessible and useful” this seems like at best like an extraordinarily poorly judged prioritisation. For the company who recently announced it has found a trillion unique URL’s showing surprise that users might prefer even basic information to a totally
blank map seems at least a little suspect.

Iain Simons writes, talks and tweets about videogames and technology. His new book, Play Britannia, is to be published in 2009. He is the director of the GameCity festival at Nottingham Trent University.
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Will anyone sing for the Brexiters?

The five acts booked to perform at pro-Brexit music festival Bpop Live are down to one.

Do Brexiters like music too? If the lineup of Bpoplive (or more accurately: “Brexit Live presents: Bpop Live”) is anything to go by, the answer is no. Ok, former lineup.

The anti-Europe rally-cum-music festival has already been postponed once, after the drum and bass duo Sigma cancelled saying they “weren’t told Bpoplive was a political event”.

But then earlier this week the party was back on, set for Sunday 19 June, 4 days before the referendum, and a week before Glastonbury, saving music lovers a difficult dilemma. The new lineup had just 5 acts: the 90s boybands East17 and 5ive, Alesha Dixon of Britain’s Got Talent and Strictly Come Dancing fame, family act Sister Sledge and Gwen Dickey of Rose Royce.

Unfortunately for those who have already shelled out £23 for a ticket, that 5 is now down to 1. First to pull out were 5ive, who told the Mirror that “as a band [they] have no political allegiances or opinions for either side.” Instead, they said, their “allegiance is first and foremost to their fans” - all 4our of them.

Next to drop was Alesha Dixon, whose spokesperson said that she decided to withdraw when it became clear that the event was to be “more of a political rally with entertainment included” than “a multi-artist pop concert in a fantastic venue in the heart of the UK”. Some reports suggested she was wary of sharing a platform with Nigel Farage, though she has no qualms about sitting behind a big desk with Simon Cowell.

A spokesperson for Sister Sledge then told Political Scrapbook that they had left the Brexit family too, swiftly followed by East 17 who decided not to stay another day.

So, it’s down to Gwen Dickey.

Dickey seems as yet disinclined to exit the Brexit stage, telling the Mirror: "I am not allowed to get into political matters in this lovely country and vote. It is not allowed as a American citizen living here. I have enough going on in my head and heart regarding matters in my own country at this time. Who will be the next President of the USA is of greater concern to me and for you?"

With the event in flux, it doesn’t look like the tickets are selling quickly.

In February, as David Cameron’s EU renegotiation floundered, the Daily Mail ran a front-page editorial asking “Who will speak for England?” Watch out for tomorrow’s update: “Who will sing for the Brexiters?”

I'm a mole, innit.