Something for the weekend: Ragdoll Cannon

Using just your mouse, fire a ragdoll from the cannon and make him/her land on the mat using the few

The Ragdoll has a particularly special place in videogame heritage. Whilst on one hand, this simplistic rendition of human anatomy stands in as an all-purpose avatar - it’s when combined with realistic(ish) physics that they can be transformed from childishly simple icons to bodies feeling hurt. The sublime dismount series demonstrated just how much we can feel the pain of the pixellated, and it was the subtle work of the Euphoria engine which really breathed life into GTA VI’s living city.

Today then, we thought we’d look to the hand-drawn strain of the ragdoll family and the deceptively simple Ragdoll Cannon. Using just your mouse, fire a ragdoll from the cannon and make him/her land on the mat using the fewest attempts possible. The chain reaction puzzles will often demand that you sacrifice some of your stickmen to reach your goal, but there’s apparently no gain without a little pain. It takes a few minutes to get used to the trajectories (remember, distance = force), but once you’ve done so you’ll find this to be a addictive little game with a charmingly homespun, pencil-drawn aesthetic.

Play Ragdoll Cannon

Iain Simons writes, talks and tweets about videogames and technology. His new book, Play Britannia, is to be published in 2009. He is the director of the GameCity festival at Nottingham Trent University.
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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.