You'll never walk alone

Google Maps has created a ‘walking’ feature making traversing city streets rather more straightforwa

If, like me, you spend much of your travelling alone to unfamiliar cities, ultimately finding yourself stood in a city street unsure of where to turn, then Google has released something which may be of interest.

Already embedded on many mobile phones, Google Maps has added a ‘walking’ feature to the direction finder within their application making traversing city streets rather more straightforward for those who travel by foot.

As explained nicely in the blog release, this will begin to fix the problem of pedestrians being forced on longer routes because they are respecting the restrictions imposed on drivers (one-way streets etc..).

Whilst still very much in beta (as this example demonstrates - failing to acknowledge the walk through a park) it’s a nice addition to an already efficient app, although it’s only really going to have real value to the mainstream user when public transport data is effectively implemented too.

Google maps

Iain Simons writes, talks and tweets about videogames and technology. His new book, Play Britannia, is to be published in 2009. He is the director of the GameCity festival at Nottingham Trent University.
GETTY
Show Hide image

The Deep Dive podcast: Mandates and Manifestos

The New Statesman's Deep Dive podcast.

Ian Leslie and Stewart Wood return for another episode of the Deep Dive. This time they're plunging into the murky world of election promises with Catherine Haddon, resident historian at the Institute of Government. Together they explore what an electoral mandate means, what a manifesto is for, and why we can't sue the government when they fail to keep their promises.

Plus: Rant or Rave? Find out which podcasts have had our hosts on tenterhooks.

Listen to this episode of The Deep Dive now:

 

0800 7318496