Preview: PAD London

International art and design fair opens tomorrow

To complete the London art fair trinity (which also includes Frieze and Moniker), PAD will set up shop in Mayfair’s Berkeley Square this week, exhibiting the very best in modern art, design, photography, jewellery and tribal art. Sixty participating galleries from Europe, the USA and Asia will present some of the most coveted and iconic contemporary pieces from around the world. The fair, originally launched in Hanover Square as DesignArt London and returning for the sixth time this year, will also feature a new PAD Prize, to be awarded to a UK-based designer under 35 years old.

“This prestigious Prize brings together the incredible talent that designers in this country have to offer and the aspiration of PAD London to promote that talent,” says architect and designer Nigel Coates, President of the Jury. “Although the UK has some of the best and most competitive art and design colleges, we don’t always have the industry to match it.”

Four major American dealers (Castelli Gallery, L&M Arts, Skarstedt Gallery and Paul Kasmin Gallery) will come together to produce a panorama of Pop Art, focusing in particular on the ever-popular stars of the movement, Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein. The Galeria Mayoral d’Art (Barcelona) are bringing Jean-Michel Basquiat’s Untitled – The Origin of Cotton, never before seen in Europe, and the Galerie Thomas (Munich) will exhibit the astonishing Les deux femmes à l’oiseau by Fernand Léger, symbolic of the artist’s turn from cubism to a more figural style incorporated thick bands of colour.

Notable in particular for its emphasis upon objects and interiors, PAD is a stylish fair which flourishes particularly in its attention to niche pursuits, decorative and tribal arts, while cultivating modern masters which comfortably rival its competitors. Appropriately housed in a Mayfair interior, the sleek fair will place innovation above all, displaying the winner of this year’s Prize in the foyer. Tickets are £20 and can be purchased by clicking the below link.

PAD London will run from 10 – 14 October.

Inside the PAD Pavilion. Photograph: PAD London.

Philip Maughan is a freelance writer in Berlin and a former Assistant Editor at the New Statesman.

Getty
Show Hide image

Commons Confidential: Hilary’s last laugh

 Benn was born into and loves the Labour Party. His was a cry of frustration. Either he enjoys the last laugh or the lachrymose coup fails.

Observing a careworn Jeremy Corbyn, you may see in his lined face his sadness about his neglected allotment in Finchley, north London, as he imagines weeds sprouting in untilled beds and aphids multiplying, untroubled by organic pesticides. If you do, you would be wrong. Corbyn is keeping his fingers green even as militant moderates plot to snatch the Labour leadership from his weakening grasp and consign Jexit to the compost heap of history.

Broad beans are this year’s bumper crop and already on the table chez Corbyn. “I planted them in October and they’re very resistant to frost,” he proudly tells visitors. “There must be ten to 20 bags’ worth left to pick.” Either Corbyn is in denial, or he was full of beans as the shadow cabinet uprooted itself.

Cider, wellies and silent discos will henceforth always evoke resignations for Tom Watson. Labour’s deputy leader was throwing shapes at Glastonbury as the Labour balloon went up. Think of Peter Mannion standing on a children’s slide for a mobile-phone signal at Stewart Pearson’s Thought Camp in The Thick of It. Watson was scheduled to replace Corbyn in the Left Field chatterati tent.

Dodging paparazzi to head back to London in his shorts, Watson confided to comrades that this episode confirmed to him that politics is a grubby business. His first act was to shower, following a weekend without washing, before trying to clear up the Labour Party’s mess.

The mass walkout from Corbyn’s top team, triggered by Hilary Benn’s sacking, was revenge for the now former shadow foreign secretary. I can reveal that Benn was reduced to tears during last year’s long reshuffle, after Jezza’s apparatchik Seumas Milne demanded guaranteed opposition to military action in Libya. Benn was born into and loves the Labour Party. His was a cry of frustration. Either he enjoys the last laugh or the lachrymose coup fails.

More tales of the wannabe prime minister Boris Johnson’s unappetising behaviour in TV make-up rooms. An artist with the blusher complained that he grabbed, uninvited, one of two cakes that she had been given as a birthday gift. He stuffed it whole into his mouth. When she finished applying the cosmetics, he snaffled the second. The Blond Ambition displayed a similar self-entitlement in championing Brexit to pursue his premiership dream.

For weirdos, every tragedy is an opportunity. Following the assassination of Jo Cox, another female Yorkshire MP received an official-looking letter purportedly from a “security consultant”, with parliamentary and Special Branch clearance, offering to review her safety. A little alarm bell sounded. He was unmasked as a Walter Mitty. The visit of two burly coppers caused him an involuntary bowel movement.

Kevin Maguire is the associate editor (politics) of the Daily Mirror

Kevin Maguire is Associate Editor (Politics) on the Daily Mirror and author of our Commons Confidential column on the high politics and low life in Westminster. An award-winning journalist, he is in frequent demand on television and radio and co-authored a book on great parliamentary scandals. He was formerly Chief Reporter on the Guardian and Labour Correspondent on the Daily Telegraph.

This article first appeared in the 30 June 2016 issue of the New Statesman, The Brexit lies