Miroslav Penkov Wins BBC International Short Story Award

First Award open to entries from overseas won by Bulgarian-American writer.

“East of the West” by Bulgarian-American writer Miroslav Penkov has won the BBC International Short Story Award 2012. Exploring the personal and political implications of leaving his native Bulgaria, the story focusing on a village separated by a river that leaves Bulgarsko Selo on the Bulgarian side, Srbsko on the Serbian. The narrator works through a painful process liberation in terms which mirror profoundly those experienced by many in throughout country’s past.

“I wanted to write about major moments of Bulgarian history,” Penkov said. “There’s this moment at the end of the 19th century after the end of the final Russian-Turkish war when the Balkans were redistributed and a portion of Bulgarians were separated from Bulgaria for good. I wanted to write about these people and remember them, but I also wanted to write my own life into theirs.”

The £15,000 prize open for one year only to writers from outside the UK and Ireland, was judged by a panel chaired by Clive Anderson. Ross Raisin, a novelist and panel member, commended the story for its “understatedness” and for being “rich in historical detail, and imagery, without over-reaching for these effects.” Other writers shortlisted for the award included previous winner and nominees Julian Gough and M J Hyland, as well as the Man Booker-shortlisted Deborah Levy.

The £2,500 runner-up prize went to Henrietta Rose-Innes, whose story “Sanctuary” offered an ominous glimpse of a missing lion, which intrudes upon a child’s otherwise expansive vision of the South African bush.

Penkov was born in Gabrovo, Bulgaria, in 1982. At 19 he moved to the United States to study Psychology at the University of Arkansas, completing an MFA the following year. He is currently Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at the University of North Texas and is editor of the American Literary Review.

“I went to the United States to study and so even though it was voluntary I found myself completely separated from the people I loved and the things I loved,” Penkov said, speaking about the emotional and historical compulsion underpinning his story. “I tried to reimagine myself through the eyes of these characters who find themselves on the two banks of a river – half of them staying in Bulgaria, the other half being given to Serbia.”

East of the West was published by Sceptre in 2011. Penkov’s story can be downloaded from the BBC4 website.

"Racho the Blacksmith" by the river in Gabrovo, Penkov's hometown in Bulgaria. Photo: Getty Images.

Philip Maughan is a freelance writer in Berlin and a former Assistant Editor at the New Statesman.

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It's Gary Lineker 1, the Sun 0

The football hero has found himself at the heart of a Twitter storm over the refugee children debate.

The Mole wonders what sort of topsy-turvy universe we now live in where Gary Lineker is suddenly being called a “political activist” by a Conservative MP? Our favourite big-eared football pundit has found himself in a war of words with the Sun newspaper after wading into the controversy over the age of the refugee children granted entry into Britain from Calais.

Pictures published earlier this week in the right-wing press prompted speculation over the migrants' “true age”, and a Tory MP even went as far as suggesting that these children should have their age verified by dental X-rays. All of which leaves your poor Mole with a deeply furrowed brow. But luckily the British Dental Association was on hand to condemn the idea as unethical, inaccurate and inappropriate. Phew. Thank God for dentists.

Back to old Big Ears, sorry, Saint Gary, who on Wednesday tweeted his outrage over the Murdoch-owned newspaper’s scaremongering coverage of the story. He smacked down the ex-English Defence League leader, Tommy Robinson, in a single tweet, calling him a “racist idiot”, and went on to defend his right to express his opinions freely on his feed.

The Sun hit back in traditional form, calling for Lineker to be ousted from his job as host of the BBC’s Match of the Day. The headline they chose? “Out on his ears”, of course, referring to the sporting hero’s most notable assets. In the article, the tabloid lays into Lineker, branding him a “leftie luvvie” and “jug-eared”. The article attacked him for describing those querying the age of the young migrants as “hideously racist” and suggested he had breached BBC guidelines on impartiality.

All of which has prompted calls for a boycott of the Sun and an outpouring of support for Lineker on Twitter. His fellow football hero Stan Collymore waded in, tweeting that he was on “Team Lineker”. Leading the charge against the Murdoch-owned title was the close ally of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn and former Channel 4 News economics editor, Paul Mason, who tweeted:

Lineker, who is not accustomed to finding himself at the centre of such highly politicised arguments on social media, responded with typical good humour, saying he had received a bit of a “spanking”.

All of which leaves the Mole with renewed respect for Lineker and an uncharacteristic desire to watch this weekend’s Match of the Day to see if any trace of his new activist persona might surface.


I'm a mole, innit.