Remembering Maurice Sendak

"Where the Wild Things Are" author leaves an enduring cultural legacy.

 

The eminent children’s author Maurice Sendak – who died today at 83 - created one of the most beautiful articulations of the fantastical isolation of childhood in recent memory. Published in 1963, Where the Wild Things Are won the Caldecott Medal as the "most distinguished picture book" a year later, and in 1970 Sendak became the first American to win the prestigious Hans Christian Andersen Award for excellence in children’s book illustration.  He’s been called the “Picasso of children’s literature”, an author who defined “a generation” of American children’s experience of literature, as playwright and long-time friend Tony Kushner once put it.

To hunt for Sendak’s legacy is to follow a trail of cultural relics across the decades. There are cheery tributes, lavished praise, Sendak’s own dry, worldly wisdom, lost anecdotes and miles of fan art. Take for instance Terrible Yellow Eyes, a project that ran from 2009 to 2010 and compiled a varied catalogue of Sendak-inspired artwork from over a hundred contributors. There’s the dozens of stories that sit contently in the archives of fanfiction.net, and the graffiti artists who’ve taken their spin on Max’s adventures public. Two years ago, Spike Jonze directed an ambitious screen adaptation of Where the Wild Things Are, and it wasn’t the first. Film versions of the fable have been around since the seventies, as has an opera and a piano concerto.

Sendak’s particular quality was his wry sense of humour and refusal to shy away from intelligent, mature prose in a pedantic genre saturated with morality tales. An author who happened to write books for children he was not, but rather a staunch defender of the honest imperfections of childhood: the darkness, the confusion, the need for escapism. “You cannot write for children. They're much too complicated,” he once asserted.  “You can only write books that are of interest to them. ” Sendak prided himself most on winning over those he wrote for, as evidenced in this endearing anecdote:

“Once a little boy sent me a charming card with a little drawing on it. I loved it. I answer all my children’s letters — sometimes very hastily — but this one I lingered over. I sent him a card and I drew a picture of a Wild Thing on it. I wrote, “Dear Jim: I loved your card.” Then I got a letter back from his mother and she said, “Jim loved your card so much he ate it.” That to me was one of the highest compliments I’ve ever received. He didn’t care that it was an original Maurice Sendak drawing or anything. He saw it, he loved it, he ate it.” (from lost.net

Maurice Sendak with his book 'Where the Wild Things Are' at the International Youth Library in Munich, 9th June 1971. (Photo: Getty Images)

Charlotte Simmonds is a writer and blogger living in London. She was formerly an editorial assistant at the New Statesman. You can follow her on Twitter @thesmallgalleon.

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Beware of tea: the cuppa has started wars and ruined lives

. . . and it once led F Scott Fitzgerald to humiliate himself.

A drink sustains me – one that steams companionably as I write. It is hot, amber and fragranced differently from any wine; nor does it have wine’s capacity to soften and blur. I’ve never understood how the great drunks of literature, Ernest Hemingway, F Scott Fitzgerald and their like, ever put anything on the page more worthwhile than a self-involved howl, though even Hemingway apparently finished the day’s writing before beginning the day’s drinking.

Tea is more kindly, or so I’d always thought. Those aromatic leaves, black or green, rolled and dried and oxidised, have some of wine’s artistry but none of its danger. Even their exoticism has waned, from a Chinese rarity (“froth of the liquid jade”), for which 17th-century English traders were made to pay in solid silver, to a product that can be found dirt cheap on supermarket shelves.

There are even home-grown teas now. The Tregothnan estate in Cornwall has supplemented its ornamental rhododendrons and camellias with their relative camellia sinensis, the tea plant, while Dalreoch in the Scottish Highlands grows a white (that is, lightly oxidised) tea, which is smoked using wood from the surrounding birch plantations. Tellingly, this local version is priced as steeply as the imported rarity once was.

I enjoy a simple, solitary mug, but I also appreciate communal tea-drinking – the delicate tea warmed with water at 85°C (a little higher for sturdier black blends), the teapot and china, the pourer volunteering to be “mother”, as if this were a liquid that could nurture. But in reality, tea is not so gentle.

Those long-ago English traders disliked haemorrhaging silver, so they started exporting opium to China from India and paying with that. This was a fabulous success, unless you happened to be Chinese. In 1839, a commissioner attempted to clamp down on the illegal and harmful trade, and the result was the Opium Wars, which the Chinese lost. “Gunboat diplomacy” – a phrase that surely constitutes froth of a different kind – won England a great deal of silver, a 150-year lease on Hong Kong and an open tea market. China received a potful of humiliation that may eventually have helped spark the Communist Revolution. As many of us have recently realised, there is nothing like economic mortification to galvanise a nation to kick its leaders.

Later, the tea bush was planted in India, Ceylon and elsewhere, and the fragrant but bitter brew for the upper classes became a ubiquitous fuel. But not an entirely sweet one: just as the opium trade ensured our tea’s arrival in the pot, the slave trade sweetened it in the cup. Even today, conditions for tea workers in places such as Assam in north-east India are often appalling.

Scott Fitzgerald also had tea trouble. When invited round by Edith Wharton, he frothed the liquid jade so assiduously with booze beforehand and risqué conversation during (a story about an American tourist couple staying unawares in a Paris bordello) that he was nearly as badly humiliated as those 19th-century Chinese. Wharton, unshocked, merely wondered aloud what the couple had done in the bordello and afterwards pronounced the entire occasion “awful”.

Some would blame his alcoholic preliminaries, but I’m not so sure. Tea has started wars and ruined lives; we should be wary of its consolations. On that sober note, I reach for the corkscrew and allow the subject to drive me softly, beguilingly, to drink.

Nina Caplan is the 2014 Fortnum & Mason Drink Writer of the Year and 2014 Louis Roederer International Wine Columnist of the Year for her columns on drink in the New Statesman. She tweets as @NinaCaplan.

This article first appeared in the 27 April 2017 issue of the New Statesman, Cool Britannia 20 Years On

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