In the Critics this week

John Gray on markets and morals, Ferdinand Mount on oligarchy and Bryan Appleyard on the iPhone at f

In the Critics section of this week’s New Statesman, John Gray reviews What Money Can’t Buy, the new book by the Harvard political philosopher Michael Sandel. “In a culture mesmerised by the market,” Gray writes, “Sandel’s is the indispensable voice of reason … He shows that the limits of markets cannot be decided by economic reasoning.” Though Gray is less confident than Sandel that disputes over the limits of markets can be resolved, he suggests that if we do “bring basic values into political life” in the way Sandel urges, “at least we won’t be stuck with the dreary market orthodoxies that he has so elegantly demolished”.

In the Books Interview, Jonathan Derbyshire discusses similar themes with Ferdinand Mount, author most recently of The New Few. Mount says that in that book he “tries to connect the two themes of inequality and oligarchy. As well suggesting that there is a connection between the two, [I] argue that power in every field today, whether it’s a retail chain or a university, is centralised.”

Also in Books: Leo Robson on Skios by Michael Frayn; Robert Irwin on The Arab Awakening by Tariq Ramadan; Liz Thomson on This Land Is Your Land: Woody Guthrie and the Journey of an American Folksong by Robert Santelli; George Eaton on Occupy by Noam Chomsky; and Ben Wilson on The Plantagenets by Dan Jones.

Our Critic at large this week is Bryan Appleyard, who marks the fifth anniversary of the launch of Apple’s iPhone. In 2007, then Apple CEO Steve Jobs declared that his company was going to “reinvent the phone”. “Jobs was right,” Appleyard writes, “he had reinvented the phone – not as a phone, but as a near-universal machine.” There remains an unresolved question, however: do we really want everything this remarkable invention gives us? “Mobile connectivity perpetually seduces us with the call of elsewhere,” Appleyard notes. “It takes us out of the moment.”

Also in the Critics: Ryan Gilbey on Alexsandr Sokurov’s take on Goethe’s Faust; Antonia Quirke on a BBC World Service documentary about Khalil Gibran; Will Self’s Madness of Crowds; Andrew Billen on Love, Love, Love at the Royal Court; Sophie Elmhirst on the joy of small-scale literary festivals; and Hunter Davies’s The Fan.

The call of elsewhere: a man checks his iPhone (Photo: Getty Images)
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The radio station where the loyal listeners are chickens

Emma Hills, the head chicken trainer at Giffords Circus, knows what gets them clucking.

“The music is for the chickens, because of course on the night the music is very loud, and so it needs to be a part of their environment from the very start.” Emma Hills, the head chicken trainer at Giffords Circus, is standing in the sawdusty ring under a big top in a field outside Stroud as several rare-breed chickens wander freely around boxes and down ramps. They are the comic stars of the summer 2017 show, and Emma is coaxing them to walk insouciantly around the ring while she plays the early-morning show on Radio 1.

It’s the chickens’ favourite station. There seems to be something about its longueurs, combined with the playlist, that gets them going – if that’s the word. They really do respond to the voices and songs. “It’s a bit painful, training,” Emma observes, as she moves a little tray of worms into position as a lure. “It’s a bit like watching paint dry sometimes. It’s all about repetition.”

Beyond the big top, a valley folds into limestone hills covered in wild parsley and the beginnings of elderblossom. Over the radio, Adele Roberts (weekdays, from 4am) hails her listeners countrywide. “Hello to Denzel, the happy trucker going north on the M6. And van driver Niki on the way from Norwich to Coventry, delivering all the things.” Pecking and quivering, the chickens are rather elegant, each with its fluffy, caramel-coloured legs and explosive feather bouffant, like a hat Elizabeth Taylor might have worn on her way to Gstaad in the 1970s.

Despite a spell of ennui during the new Harry Styles single, enthusiasm resumes as Adele bids “hello to Simon from Bournemouth on the M3 – he’s on his way to Stevenage delivering meat”. I don’t imagine Radio 1 could hope for a better review: to these pretty creatures, its spiel is as thrilling as opening night at the circus. Greasepaint, swags of velvet, acrobats limbering up with their proud, ironic grace. Gasps from beholders rippling wonder across the stalls.

Emma muses that her pupils learn fast. Like camels, a chicken never forgets.

“I’ve actually given up eating them,” she admits. “Last year I had only two weeks to train and it was like, ‘If they pull this off I won’t eat chicken ever again.’ And they did. So I didn’t.” 

Antonia Quirke is an author and journalist. She is a presenter on The Film Programme and Pick of the Week (Radio 4) and Film 2015 and The One Show (BBC 1). She writes a column on radio for the New Statesman.

This article first appeared in the 25 May 2017 issue of the New Statesman, Why Islamic State targets Britain

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