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In the Critics this week

John Gray on markets and morals, Ferdinand Mount on oligarchy and Bryan Appleyard on the iPhone at f

iPhone
The call of elsewhere: a man checks his iPhone (Photo: Getty Images)

In the Critics section of this week’s New Statesman, John Gray reviews What Money Can’t Buy, the new book by the Harvard political philosopher Michael Sandel. “In a culture mesmerised by the market,” Gray writes, “Sandel’s is the indispensable voice of reason … He shows that the limits of markets cannot be decided by economic reasoning.” Though Gray is less confident than Sandel that disputes over the limits of markets can be resolved, he suggests that if we do “bring basic values into political life” in the way Sandel urges, “at least we won’t be stuck with the dreary market orthodoxies that he has so elegantly demolished”.

In the Books Interview, Jonathan Derbyshire discusses similar themes with Ferdinand Mount, author most recently of The New Few. Mount says that in that book he “tries to connect the two themes of inequality and oligarchy. As well suggesting that there is a connection between the two, [I] argue that power in every field today, whether it’s a retail chain or a university, is centralised.”

Also in Books: Leo Robson on Skios by Michael Frayn; Robert Irwin on The Arab Awakening by Tariq Ramadan; Liz Thomson on This Land Is Your Land: Woody Guthrie and the Journey of an American Folksong by Robert Santelli; George Eaton on Occupy by Noam Chomsky; and Ben Wilson on The Plantagenets by Dan Jones.

Our Critic at large this week is Bryan Appleyard, who marks the fifth anniversary of the launch of Apple’s iPhone. In 2007, then Apple CEO Steve Jobs declared that his company was going to “reinvent the phone”. “Jobs was right,” Appleyard writes, “he had reinvented the phone – not as a phone, but as a near-universal machine.” There remains an unresolved question, however: do we really want everything this remarkable invention gives us? “Mobile connectivity perpetually seduces us with the call of elsewhere,” Appleyard notes. “It takes us out of the moment.”

Also in the Critics: Ryan Gilbey on Alexsandr Sokurov’s take on Goethe’s Faust; Antonia Quirke on a BBC World Service documentary about Khalil Gibran; Will Self’s Madness of Crowds; Andrew Billen on Love, Love, Love at the Royal Court; Sophie Elmhirst on the joy of small-scale literary festivals; and Hunter Davies’s The Fan.