Competition: Stoke Newington Literary Festival

Win two weekend passes to festival sponsored by the New Statesman.

The New Statesman is proud media sponsor of the third Stoke Newington Literary Festival. It’s year three of this eclectic, amusing, inspiring and sometimes audacious festival and we are offering readers the opportunity to enter a competition to win weekend passes for the festival and take a guest. 

To enter – simply tell us the name of the well known BBC News anchorman who is participating in the festival this year.  The first two correct entries drawn will win two weekend passes each – email your entries to comp@newstatesman.co.uk and write Stoke Newington Literary Festival in the subject line. The draw will take place on 25 May and winners will be informed by email.

The Festival runs over the first part of the Jubilee weekend and starts on Friday 1 June with a Gala evening including Josie Long, Robin Ince and Pauline Black.

On Saturday the events continue when Iain Sinclair, China Miéville, Laura Oldfield Ford and Ken Worpole debate the Olympics legacy and George Alagiah, Giles Oldroyd (of the John Innes Research Centre) and Hattie Ellis discuss Global vs Local Food, there are many more literary, film and music and comedy events and the headline event for Saturday evening is John Cooper Clarke with Simon Day.

On Sunday - Padraig Reidy (Index on Censorship) has put together a media reform panel including: Nick Cohen, Brian Cathcart, Dan Hind and Suzanne Moore;  there is also the People's History of London event with John Rees and Lindsey German and many more events for adults and children.

For a full programme visit: Stokenewingtonliteraryfestival.com

Tickets are available through: ticketweb.co.uk

"From Gothic horror stories to true Victorian crime, reggae to Dr Seuss, the best new poetry to the new hopefuls of English fiction, this festival is more low-key but in many ways a more enjoyable version of its blockbusting cousins. Long may it continue." New Statesman

"Just like Hay-on-Wye. But in Hackney" Time Out

"The coolest literary festival of the summer" Authonomy

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Brexit… Leg-sit

A new poem by Jo-Ella Sarich. 

Forgot Brexit. An ostrich just walked into the room. Actually,
forget ostriches too. Armadillos also have legs, and shoulder plates
like a Kardashian.  Then I walked in, the other version of me, the one
with legs like wilding pines, when all of them

are the lumberjacks. Forget forests. Carbon sinks are down
this month; Switzerland is the neutral territory
that carved out an island for itself. My body
is the battleground you sketch. My body is
the greenfield development, and you
are the heavy earthmoving equipment. Forget
the artillery in the hills
and the rooftops opening up like nesting boxes. Forget about

the arms race. Cheekbones are the new upper arms
since Michelle lost out to Melania. My cheekbones
are the Horsehead Nebula and you are the Russians
at warp speed. Race you to the finish. North Korea

will go away if you stop thinking
about it. South Korea will, too. Stop thinking
about my sternum. Stop thinking about
the intricacy of my mitochondria. Thigh gaps
are the new wage gaps, and mine is like
the space between the redwood stand
and the plane headed for the mountains. Look,

I’ve pulled up a presentation
with seven different eschatologies
you might like to try. Forget that my arms
are the yellow tape around the heritage tree. Forget
about my exoskeleton. Forget
that the hermit crab
has no shell of its own. Forget that the crab ever
walked sideways into the room.
Pay attention, people.

Jo-Ella Sarich is a New Zealand-based lawyer and poet. Her poems have appeared in the Galway Review and the Poetry New Zealand Yearbook 2017.

This article first appeared in the 17 August 2017 issue of the New Statesman, Trump goes nuclear