Competition: Stoke Newington Literary Festival

Win two weekend passes to festival sponsored by the New Statesman.

The New Statesman is proud media sponsor of the third Stoke Newington Literary Festival. It’s year three of this eclectic, amusing, inspiring and sometimes audacious festival and we are offering readers the opportunity to enter a competition to win weekend passes for the festival and take a guest. 

To enter – simply tell us the name of the well known BBC News anchorman who is participating in the festival this year.  The first two correct entries drawn will win two weekend passes each – email your entries to and write Stoke Newington Literary Festival in the subject line. The draw will take place on 25 May and winners will be informed by email.

The Festival runs over the first part of the Jubilee weekend and starts on Friday 1 June with a Gala evening including Josie Long, Robin Ince and Pauline Black.

On Saturday the events continue when Iain Sinclair, China Miéville, Laura Oldfield Ford and Ken Worpole debate the Olympics legacy and George Alagiah, Giles Oldroyd (of the John Innes Research Centre) and Hattie Ellis discuss Global vs Local Food, there are many more literary, film and music and comedy events and the headline event for Saturday evening is John Cooper Clarke with Simon Day.

On Sunday - Padraig Reidy (Index on Censorship) has put together a media reform panel including: Nick Cohen, Brian Cathcart, Dan Hind and Suzanne Moore;  there is also the People's History of London event with John Rees and Lindsey German and many more events for adults and children.

For a full programme visit:

Tickets are available through:

"From Gothic horror stories to true Victorian crime, reggae to Dr Seuss, the best new poetry to the new hopefuls of English fiction, this festival is more low-key but in many ways a more enjoyable version of its blockbusting cousins. Long may it continue." New Statesman

"Just like Hay-on-Wye. But in Hackney" Time Out

"The coolest literary festival of the summer" Authonomy

Stoke Newington
Kyle Seeley
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For emotional value, Emily is Away – a nostalgic instant messaging game – is this year’s best release

If you want to express your lingering teenage angst, there’s no better option.

Every now and then, a game is released that goes beyond what it may look or sound like. It goes straight to the pit of your insides where you thought you had no soul left, and jolts you back to life. Or at least it attempts to. This year, it's Emily is Away.

Firstly, anyone and everyone can virtually play this thing as it’s a crude Windows XP simulator displaying an AIM/MSN messenger client and can run on the PC equivalent of a potato. And it's free. It’s a short game, taking about 30 minutes, in which you play a person chatting away to your friend called Emily (who could be more), choosing from a set list of pre-selected instant messages.

Each chapter takes place in a different year, starting in 2002 and ending in 2006.

You’re instantly smacked with nostalgia thanks to the user screen of Windows XP and a fuzzed out background of Bliss, which was the default wallpaper in the operating system, and probably the most widely seen photo in the world. And your ears aren’t abandoned either, with the upbeat pinging sounds reminiscent of how you used to natter away with your personal favourite into the early hours.

The first chapter starts with you and Emily reaching the end of your last year in high school, talking about plans for the evening, but also the future, such as what you’ll be studying at university. From this early point, the seeds of the future are already being sewn.

For example, Emily mentions how Brad is annoying her in another window on her computer, but you’re both too occupied about agreeing to go to a party that night. The following year, you learn that Brad is now in fact her boyfriend, because he decided to share how he felt about Emily while you were too shy and keeping your feelings hidden.

What’s so excellent about the game is that it can be whatever you wish. Retro games used the lack of visual detail to their advantage, allowing the players to fill in the blanks. The yearly gaps in this game do exactly the same job, making you long to go back in time, even if you haven't yet reached the age of 20 in the game.

Or it lets you forget about it entirely and move on, not knowing exactly what had happened with you and Emily as your brain starts to create the familiar fog of a faded memory.

Despite having the choice to respond to Emily’s IMs in three different ways each time, your digital self tries to sweeten the messages with emoticons, but they’re always automatically deleted, the same way bad spelling is corrected in the game too. We all know that to truly to take the risk and try and move a friendship to another level, emoticons are the digital equivalent to cheesy real-life gestures, and essential to trying to win someone’s heart.

Before you know it, your emotions are heavily invested in the game and you’re always left wondering what Emily wanted to say when the game shows that she’s deleting as well as typing in the messenger. You end up not even caring that she likes Coldplay and Muse – passions reflected in her profile picture and use of their lyrics. She also likes Snow Patrol. How much can you tolerate Chasing Cars, really?

The user reviews on Steam are very positive, despite many complaining you end up being “friend-zoned” by Emily, and one review simply calling it “Rejection Simulator 2015”.

I tried so hard from all of the options to create the perfect Em & Em. But whatever you decide, Emily will always give you the #feels, and you’ll constantly end up thinking about what else you could have done.