Competition: Stoke Newington Literary Festival

Win two weekend passes to festival sponsored by the New Statesman.

The New Statesman is proud media sponsor of the third Stoke Newington Literary Festival. It’s year three of this eclectic, amusing, inspiring and sometimes audacious festival and we are offering readers the opportunity to enter a competition to win weekend passes for the festival and take a guest. 

To enter – simply tell us the name of the well known BBC News anchorman who is participating in the festival this year.  The first two correct entries drawn will win two weekend passes each – email your entries to comp@newstatesman.co.uk and write Stoke Newington Literary Festival in the subject line. The draw will take place on 25 May and winners will be informed by email.

The Festival runs over the first part of the Jubilee weekend and starts on Friday 1 June with a Gala evening including Josie Long, Robin Ince and Pauline Black.

On Saturday the events continue when Iain Sinclair, China Miéville, Laura Oldfield Ford and Ken Worpole debate the Olympics legacy and George Alagiah, Giles Oldroyd (of the John Innes Research Centre) and Hattie Ellis discuss Global vs Local Food, there are many more literary, film and music and comedy events and the headline event for Saturday evening is John Cooper Clarke with Simon Day.

On Sunday - Padraig Reidy (Index on Censorship) has put together a media reform panel including: Nick Cohen, Brian Cathcart, Dan Hind and Suzanne Moore;  there is also the People's History of London event with John Rees and Lindsey German and many more events for adults and children.

For a full programme visit: Stokenewingtonliteraryfestival.com

Tickets are available through: ticketweb.co.uk

"From Gothic horror stories to true Victorian crime, reggae to Dr Seuss, the best new poetry to the new hopefuls of English fiction, this festival is more low-key but in many ways a more enjoyable version of its blockbusting cousins. Long may it continue." New Statesman

"Just like Hay-on-Wye. But in Hackney" Time Out

"The coolest literary festival of the summer" Authonomy

Stoke Newington
Harry Styles. Photo: Getty
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How podcasts are reviving the excitement of listening to the pop charts

Unbreak My Chart and Song Exploder are two music programmes that provide nostalgia and innovation in equal measure.

“The world as we know it is over. The apo­calypse is nigh, and he is risen.” Although these words came through my headphones over the Easter weekend, they had very little to do with Jesus Christ. Fraser McAlpine, who with Laura Snapes hosts the new pop music podcast Unbreak My Chart, was talking about a very different kind of messiah: Harry Styles, formerly of the boy band One Direction, who has arrived with his debut solo single just in time to save the British charts from becoming an eternal playlist of Ed Sheeran’s back-catalogue.

Unbreak My Chart is based on a somewhat nostalgic premise. It claims to be “the podcast that tapes the Top Ten and then talks about it at school the next day”. For those of us who used to do just that, this show takes us straight back to Sunday afternoons, squatting on the floor with a cassette player, finger hovering over the Record button as that tell-tale jingle teased the announcement of a new number one.

As pop critics, Snapes and McAlpine have plenty of background information and anecdotes to augment their rundown of the week’s chart. If only all playground debates about music had been so well informed. They also move the show beyond a mere list, debating the merits of including figures for music streamed online as well as physical and digital sales in the chart (this innovation is partly responsible for what they call “the Sheeran singularity” of recent weeks). The hosts also discuss charts from other countries such as Australia and Brazil.

Podcasts are injecting much-needed innovation into music broadcasting. Away from the scheduled airwaves of old-style radio, new formats are emerging. In the US, for instance, Song Exploder, which has just passed its hundredth episode, invites artists to “explode” a single piece of their own music, taking apart the layers of vocal soundtrack, instrumentation and beats to show the creative process behind it all. The calm tones of the show’s host, Hrishikesh Hirway, and its high production values help to make it a very intimate listening experience. For a few minutes, it is possible to believe that the guests – Solange, Norah Jones, U2, Iggy Pop, Carly Rae Jepsen et al – are talking and singing only for you. 

Caroline Crampton is assistant editor of the New Statesman. She writes a weekly podcast column.

This article first appeared in the 20 April 2017 issue of the New Statesman, May's gamble

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