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In the Critics this week

John Gray on Richard Holloway, Richard Evans on A N Wilson and Claude Lanzmann interviewed.

In the Critics in this week's New Statesman, the NS's lead book reviewer John Gray is entranced by Richard Holloway's memoir Leaving Alexandria.This is "a profound, personal investigation of the virtues and flaws of religion," Gray writes, "and the most stirring autobiography I have read in a great many years." Holloway's thinking on religion, Gray argues, is "searching and subtle", and his agnosticism "poses a more fundamental challenge to Christianity than any that has been posed by the so-called new atheists".

In the Books Interview, Sophie Elmhirst talks to John Lanchester about his new novel Capital. This is both a book about London, Lanchester says, and a book about the ubiquitous language of money. Of the latter, he says: "It's like ... a code written on the surface of things; it's in flow all around us, all the time ... I was keen to ... see some of the specific ways in which specific sums of money exert different forces on different characters at different times."

Also in Books, the leading historian of the Third Reich Richard J Evans reviews A N Wilson's Hitler: a Short Biography. Noting that Wilson doesn't appear to read German, Evans writes: "[He does not] seem to have thought very hard or taken much care over what little reading he has done". All we find, Evans concludes, is "evidence of the repellent arrogance of a man who thinks that because he is a celebrated novelist, he can write a book about Hitler that people should read, even though he's put very little work into writing it and even less thought."

Other book reviews: Olivia Laing on Hope: a Tragedy by Shalom Auslander; Ed Smith on American Gridlock by H Woody Brock; David Shariatmadari on Patriot of Persia by Christopher de Bellaigue.

Elsewhere in the Critics: Jonathan Derbyshire profiles Claude Lanzmann, resistance fighter, writer and director of Shoah; Ryan Gilbey on Trishna, Michael Winterbottom's updating of Tess of the d'Urbevilles; Rachel Cooke is dismayed by the "tick-box drama" of White Heat on BBC2; Helen Lewis pays tribute to Peter Cook; Ludovic Hunter-Tilney meets Alice Coleman, scourge of the tower block; and Antonia Quirke listens to Desert Island Discs. PLUS: "Posthumous", a poem by Olivia Byard; Will Self's Madness of Crowds; and The Fan by Hunter Davies.

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