The Friday Arts Diary

Exhibitions

Whitechapel Gallery, E1, Gillian Wearing, from 28 March

In an image-driven digital world, how large is the dichotomy between how we present ourselves to others, and who we truly are? This is the question that shapes the Turner Prize winning artist's new exhibition, which uses film and photography to explore the modern sense of identity.

Books

Clapham Grand, SW11, Book Slam, 27 March

Author of the bestselling novel Any Human Heart William Boyd reads from his new novel Waiting for Sunrise. Plus, there's an appearance from poet Martin Figura, and music from Jono McCleery

Film

BFI Southbank, SE1, London Lesbian and Gay Film Festival, 24 March -1 April

This year's festival includes exclusive gala screenings of Cloudburst, Absent and North Sea Texas, as well as another chance to revisit highlights from the last year, including Potiche and Bol. The programme also showcases the best of international queer cinema, and a varied programme of festival events.

Music

Barbican, EC2Y, Roberto Fonseca, 26 March.

One of the stars of Gilles Peterson's Havana Cultura band, the pianist plays tracks from his new album YO, an expert blend of Afro-Cuban beats and jazz lyricism. Plus support from Ayanna.

Theatre

Soho Theatre, W1D, 7 Day Drunk, until 31 March

This raucous one-woman show explores the relationship between mind-altering substances and creativity. Join the star of the show Bryony Kimmings as she throws a party on 30 March at the Soho downstairs.

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Hillary and the Viking: dramatising life with the Clintons

August radio should be like a corkboard, with a few gems pinned here and there. Heck, Don’t Vote for Him is one.

Now is the season of repeats and stand-in presenters. Nobody minds. August radio ought to be like a corkboard – things seemingly long pinned and faded (an Angela Lansbury doc on Radio 2; an adaptation of Charlotte Brontë’s The Professor on Radio 4 Extra) and then the occasional bright fragment. Like Martha Argerich playing Liszt’s Piano Concerto No 1 at the Albert Hall (Prom 43, 17 August).

But on Radio 4, two new things really stand out. An edition of In the Criminologist’s Chair (16 August, 4pm) in which the former bank robber (and diagnosed psychopath) Noel “Razor” Smith recalls, among other memorable moments, sitting inside a getaway car watching one of his fellows “kissing his bullets” before loading. And three new dramas imagining key episodes in the Clintons’ personal and political lives.

In the first (Heck, Don’t Vote for Him, 6 August, 2.30pm), Hillary battles with all the “long-rumoured allegations of marital infidelity” during the 1992 Democratic primaries. Fenella Woolgar’s (brilliant, unburlesqued) Hillary sounds like a woman very often wearing a fantastically unhappy grin, watching her own political ambitions slip through her fingers. “I deserve something,” she appeals to her husband, insisting on the position of attorney general should he make it to the top – but “the Viking” (his nickname at college, due to his great head of hair) is off, gladhanding the room. You can hear Woolgar’s silent flinch, and picture Hillary’s face as it has been these past, disquieting months, very clearly.

I once saw Bill Clinton speak at a community college in New Jersey during the 2008 Obama campaign. Although disposed not to like him, I found his wattage, without question, staggering. Sweeping through the doors of the canteen, he amusedly removed the microphone from the hands of the MC (a local baseball star), switched it off, and projected for 25 fluent minutes (no notes). Before leaving he turned and considered the smallest member of the audience – a cross-legged child clutching a picture book of presidents. In one gesture, Clinton flipped it out of the boy’s hands, signed the cover – a picture of Lincoln – and was gone.

Antonia Quirke is an author and journalist. She is a presenter on The Film Programme and Pick of the Week (Radio 4) and Film 2015 and The One Show (BBC 1). She writes a column on radio for the New Statesman.

This article first appeared in the 28 July 2016 issue of the New Statesman, Summer Double Issue