In the Critics this week

Leo Robson on Patrick Flannery and Nadine Gordimer, the books interview with Ben Okri, and David Rot

Leo Robson notes that "the South Africa of today is seductive territory for a novelist" and demands a great deal of sensitivity when dealing with the complexities post-apartheid life. In this week's New Statesman, Robson reviews two new novels which attempt to do just that: Absolution by Patrick Flannery and No Time Like the Present by Nadine Gordimer. The former, he says, "builds up a glorious mosaic of forms, though some of the pieces are slightly chipped" as Flannery deals with a pervasive sense of nationwide guilt, whilst Gordimer's story of a couple trying to come to terms with life after aparteid struggle is rendered in "a bespoke style, at once rich and poor".

In the books interview, Sophie Elmhirst talks to Ben Okri about his new poetry collection, Wild. Okri speaks of his approach to writing as a dreamlike experience, and comments on the metaphysical elements to his work as "something that comes out of the African tradition".

Our critic at large this week is David Rothenberg; discussing the awe-inspiring elements of nature and its role in "aesthetic selection", he claims that the beauty of a peacock's wings is something which the study of genetics cannot necessarily explain: "Darwinians have tried to turn sexual selection into a subset of natural selection and they have done it by using a method based not on research but on faith". He writes that "any unified theory of evolution has to be able to appreciate beauty, without explaining it in such a way that its allure its lost".

Elsewhere In the Critics section: Richard Holloway on Roger Scruton's The Face of God, the Gifford Lectures; Amanda Craig on The Beginner's Goodbye by Anne Tyler; Ryan Gilbey on This Is Not a Film and Into the Abyss: a Tale of Death, a Tale of Life; and Rachel Cooke's take on Julian Fellowes's latest period drama, Titanic. Plus, Will Self's Real Meals.
 

Nadine Gordimer's new novel "No Time Like the Present" reviewed. Photo: Getty Images

A year on from the Spending Review, the coalition's soothsayer has emerged to offer another gloomy economic prognosis. Asked by ITV News whether he could promise that there wouldn't be a double-dip recession, Vince Cable replied: "I can't do that.

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SRSLY #45: Love, Nina, Internet Histories Week, The Secret in Their Eyes

This week on the pop culture podcast, we chat Nick Hornby’s adaptation of Nina Stibbe’s literary memoir, our histories on the internet, and an Oscar-winning 2009 Argentinian thriller.

This is SRSLY, the pop culture podcast from the New Statesman. Here, you can find links to all the things we talk about in the show as well as a bit more detail about who we are and where else you can find us online.

...or subscribe in iTunes. We’re also on StitcherRSS and SoundCloud – but if you use a podcast app that we’re not appearing in, let us know.

SRSLY is hosted by Caroline Crampton and Anna Leszkiewicz, the NS’s web editor and editorial assistant. We’re on Twitter as @c_crampton and @annaleszkie, where between us we post a heady mixture of Serious Journalism, excellent gifs and regularly ask questions J K Rowling needs to answer.

The Links

Love, Nina

The first episode on iPlayer.

An interview with Nina Stibbe about the book.

Internet Histories Week

The index of all the posts in the series.

Our conversation about MSN Messenger.

The Secret in Their Eyes

The trailer.

For next week

Anna is watching 30 Rock.

If you’d like to talk to us about the podcast or make a suggestion for something we should read or cover, you can email srslypod[at]gmail.com.

You can also find us on Twitter @srslypod, or send us your thoughts on tumblr here. If you like the podcast, we’d love you to leave a review on iTunes - this helps other people come across it.

We love reading out your emails. If you have thoughts you want to share on anything we’ve discussed, or questions you want to ask us, please email us on srslypod[at]gmail.com, or @ us on Twitter @srslypod, or get in touch via tumblr here. We also have Facebook now.

Our theme music is “Guatemala - Panama March” (by Heftone Banjo Orchestra), licensed under Creative Commons. 

See you next week!

PS If you missed #44, check it out here.