Trippingly on the tongue

Listen to Shakespeare as he’s never been heard before.

Understanding Shakespeare's language has long been a tiresome chore for school pupils and students around the globe - jokes that have lost their punch after 400 years, puns that leave readers nonplussed, unusual rhythms - all can act as barriers to an appreciation of the plays. But a new CD release from the British Library might just offer some relief from any Bard-induced woes.

For the very first time, a recording of the texts in the original Elizabethan pronunciation has been compiled, bringing the listener closer to how Shakespeare would have intended his work to be heard. The CD includes extracts from A Midsummer Night's Dream, Romeo and Juliet and Macbeth, as well as a selection of sonnets, all recorded under the guidance of Shakespearean pronuciation expert, Ben Crystal..

Accompanying the disc is an essay from Professor David Crystal, in which he explains: "When we hear original pronunciation used in relation to Shakespeare, we enter a new auditory world...Original pronunciation suggests fresh contrasts in speech style, such as between young and old, court and commoners, or literate and illiterate; and it motivates unexpected possibilities of character interpretation. Original pronunciation also illustrates what Hamlet meant when he advised the players to speak "trippingly upon the tongue".' Crystal wrote about Shakespeare for the New Statesman back in 2004. Read his review of Frank Kermode's The Age of Shakespeare here.

A special event to celebrate the release will be held on 4 May 2012, featuring live performances from Ben Crystal and the company of actors who contributed to the CD.

"Shakespeare's Original Pronunciation" is published by the British Library on 14 March (£10)

Val Doone/Getty Images
Show Hide image

“The Hole-Up”: a poem by Matthew Sweeney

“You could taste the raw / seagull you’d killed and plucked, / the mussels you’d dug from sand, / the jellyfish that wobbled in your / hands as you slobbered it.”

Lying on your mouth and nose
on the hot sand, you recall
a trip in a boat to the island –
the fat rats that skittered about
after god-knows-what dinner,
the chubby seals staring up,
the sudden realisation that a man
on the run had wintered there
while the soldiers scoured
the entire shoreline to no avail –
you knew now you had been him
out there. You could taste the raw
seagull you’d killed and plucked,
the mussels you’d dug from sand,
the jellyfish that wobbled in your
hands as you slobbered it.
You saw again that first flame
those rubbed stones woke in
the driftwood pile, and that rat
you grilled on a spar and found
delicious. Yes, you’d been that man,
and you had to admit now you
missed that time, that life,
though you were very glad you
had no memory of how it ended.


Matthew Sweeney’s Black Moon was shortlisted for the 2007 T S Eliot Prize. His latest collection is Inquisition Lane (Bloodaxe).

This article first appeared in the 21 July 2016 issue of the New Statesman, The English Revolt