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In the Critics this week

Stuart Maconie on the Doors, Kate Williams on the gothic novel, Simon Blackburn on human nature and

In the Critics section of this week's New Statesman, Stuart Maconie reviews The Doors by leading American rock critic Greil Marcus. Even Marcus, a "magisterial and important writer", isn't able to persuade Maconie that the Doors aren't "the most overrated bands in the history of rock music". Doors frontman Jim Morrison embodied all the band's shortcomings, Maconie argues: "Watch the old footage of him, preening in his leather kecks, his self-satisfied, puppy-fat-frat-boy face pursed waxily as he declaims some sententious claptrap ..."

In the Books interview, Jonathan Derbyshire talks to American author Chad Harbach, whose first novel The Art of Fielding was published to great acclaim in the US in the autumn and has just been published in this country. The book is about a college baseball team, and Harbach says two of the principal influences on him when he was writing it were Don DeLillo and David Foster Wallace: "They are two of the only novelists who have really thought about the relation of sport to larger society" DeLillo's End Zone and Wallace's Infinite Jest were, he says, "models" for The Art of Fielding.

Also in Books: Simon Blackburn on Beyond Human Nature by Jesse Prinz; Simon Kuper on Sport Italia: the Italian Lover Affair With Sport by Simon Martin; Helen Lewis-Hasteley on The Brain Is Wider Than the Sky by Bryan Appleyard and How Is the Internet Changing the Way You Think? By John Brockman; and Leo Robson on Masscult and Midcult by Dwight Macdonald.

This week's Critic at large is historian and novelist Kate Williams, who examines the enduring appeal of the gothic novel: "Gothic fascinations," Williams writes, "tend to increase with recessions. [Mary Shelley's] Frankenstein was perfectly fitted to the economic slump that followed the end of the [Napoleonic] wars. ... Recession ... makes us desperate for distraction - the more monstrous the better."

Also in the Critics: Ryan Gilbey on Shame and Margin Call; Rachel Cooke on ITV's Eternal Law; Alex Preston reports from a British Council-sponsored event in Athens; Antonia Quirke on a radio history of the obituary; Will Self on the suburban way of death; and "Endowments" by Terry Jones, the winner of first prize in the Bridport Prize, 2011.