"I shall vote Labour"

Christopher Logue, whose poems were published by the NS in the 50s/60s, dies at 85.

The poet Christopher Logue, who died last Friday at the age of 85, was best known for his project - which spanned fifty years - to adapt Homer's Iliad as an epic, modernist poem. Logue's War Music appeared as five print volumes and the final collection, published by Faber as Logue's Homer: Cold Calls: War Music Continued: Vol 1, won the 2006 Whitbread Poetry Prize and long overdue recognition for the English poet.

Unlike the modernist greats whose attachments to the Greek classics were coupled with deep rooted Conservatism - think Eliot, Pound - Logue was of the loosely-liberal British Poetry Revival movement and an active leftie throughout his life.

In 1960, Logue became an original member of the Committee of 100, the anti-war group set up by Bertrand Russell to voice their opposition to the British government's nuclear policy. From the late Fifties through the Seventies he contributed to Private Eye and the New Statesman, participated in CND marches and lead social programmes to bring poetry to workers on the factory floors.

In March 1966, after just 17 months in office, sitting prime minister Harold Wilson held a general election and campaigned under the slogan "You know Labour Government Works". The same year, Logue wrote the following poem. "I shall vote Labour" was first published by the New Statesman, and that spring the British public re-elected Prime Minister Wilson, increasing the Labour government majority from just four seats to a comfortable 96.

 

I shall vote Labour

I shall vote Labour because
God votes Labour.
I shall vote Labour to protect
the sacred institution of The Family.
I shall vote Labour because
I am a dog.
I shall vote Labour because
upper-class hoorays annoy me in expensive restaurants.
I shall vote Labour because
I am on a diet.
I shall vote Labour because if I don't
somebody else will:
AND
I shall vote Labour because if one person
does it
everybody will be wanting to do it.
I shall vote Labour because if I do not vote Labour
my balls will drop off.
I shall vote Labour because
there are too few cars on the road.
I shall vote Labour because I am
a hopeless drug addict.
I shall vote Labour because
I failed to be a dollar millionaire aged three.
I shall vote Labour because Labour will build
more maximum security prisons.
I shall vote Labour because I want to shop
in an all-weather precinct stretching from Yeovil to Glasgow.
I shall vote Labour because
the Queen's stamp collection is the best
in the world.
I shall vote Labour because
deep in my heart
I am a Conservative.

 

 

Alice Gribbin is a Teaching-Writing Fellow at the Iowa Writers' Workshop. She was formerly the editorial assistant at the New Statesman.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Karen Bradley as Culture Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport.

The most politically charged of the culture minister's responsibilities is overseeing the BBC, and to anyone who works for - or simply loves - the national broadcaster, Karen Bradley has one big point in her favour. She is not John Whittingdale. Her predecessor as culture secretary was notorious for his belief that the BBC was a wasteful, over-mighty organisation which needed to be curbed. And he would have had ample opportunity to do this: the BBC's Charter is due for renewal next year, and the licence fee is only fixed until 2017. 

In her previous job at the Home Office, Karen Bradley gained a reputation as a calm, low-key minister. It now seems likely that the charter renewal will be accomplished with fewer frothing editorials about "BBC bias" and more attention to the challenges facing the organisation as viewing patterns fragment and increasing numbers of viewers move online.

Of the rest of the job, the tourism part just got easier: with the pound so weak, it will be easier to attract visitors to Britain from abroad. And as for press regulation, there is no word strong enough to describe how long the grass is into which it has been kicked.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.